The art of golf

Exhibit captures beloved sport through its people, places

MORRIS MUSEUM OF ART/SPECIAL
Ray Ellis used oil on canvas to depict Augusta National Golf Club, Club House, ca. 1983.
  • Follow Applause

Golf lovers can see their favorite images of the sport on canvas at a new exhibit at Morris Museum of Art.

Back | Next
The Palmer Finesse, 1994 is the work of artist Lucy McTier, who created the iconic golfer using oil on canvas. The work is part of the collection of the Morris Communications Co.  LUCY MCTIER/SPECIAL
LUCY MCTIER/SPECIAL
The Palmer Finesse, 1994 is the work of artist Lucy McTier, who created the iconic golfer using oil on canvas. The work is part of the collection of the Morris Communications Co.

Fore! Images in Golf opens Saturday, Feb. 4, and will remain on view through April 15.

The exhibit features images by leading contemporary artists related to golf, including the people who play the game and the places where it is played, said director Kevin Grogan.

“We were aiming for a contemporary view of this historically and socially important thing – the game of golf,” Grogan said. “We have some wonderful landscapes, both watercolor and oils by Linda Hartough. She’s particularly renowned for great American landscapes that happen to be of golf courses.”

Other featured artists include well-known painter LeRoy Neiman, now in his 90s, who is one of the best known artists in the country, Grogan said. Fore! Images in Golf will feature his painting of Tiger Woods, which is named Tiger in the Woods.

“He has a style that is uniquely his own,” Grogan said of Neiman.

Other well-known artists featured are Dan Rizzie and Will Barnet, one of the great American painters of the 21st century, he said.

For one week out of the year, Augusta is the mecca for golfers. Grogan hopes the exhibit will be an attraction for people in town for the Masters Tournament. Usually closed on Mondays, the museum will be open the Monday of Masters Week, he said.

“We wanted to have something that lined up with the Masters. Apart from that, the South, in a peculiar way, is home to golf, historically speaking. It’s where golf made its first inroads in this country, long before it was this country,” Grogan said.

For instance, golf clubs and balls were delivered to Charleston, S.C., in 1743. By 1873, there was a golf club operating in Savannah, Ga., he said.

The exhibit also has some images that make fun of the people who play golf, and golf itself. A painting by Rizzie captures actor Bill Murray as the character Carl Spackler from the movie Caddyshack.

Fore! Images in Golf also features local artists Philip Morseberger, the late Bill Maypole and Jace McTier.

FORE! IMAGES IN GOLF EXHIBIT

WHEN: Through April 15; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday (The museum will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the Monday of Masters Week. Closed Easter Sunday.)

WHERE: Morris Museum of Art: 1 10th St.

ADMISSION: $5 adults, $3 ages 13 to 17, free for ages 12 and younger and $3 for students and military with ID and seniors ages 65 and older. Museum members receive free admission. Admission is free on Sundays.

MORE: (706) 724-7501, themorris.org


Search Augusta jobs