SC Republican governor hopefuls make their case at Aiken forum

Monday, Jan. 18, 2010 4:10 PM
Last updated 4:21 PM
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AIKEN – All four Republican gubernatorial candidates said the next South Carolina governor should champion conservative spending, education and infrastructure.

Attorney General Henry McMaster, Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer, U.S. Rep Gresham Barrett and state Rep. Nikki Haley presented their platforms to a packed room in Newberry Hall this afternoon.

The Aiken Republican Club sponsored the debate with club member and former city councilwoman Jane Vaughters serving as moderator.

The 45-minute debate gave the candidates an opportunity to touch on their goals as governor, their position on the federal stimulus and other questions posed by the club’s board members.

McMaster said leadership has been lacking in the gubernatorial office, and, if elected, his experience and maturity would bring leadership back to the forefront.

“My job has not been to vote ‘yes’ or ‘no,’” he said this afternoon. “It was to find problems, find solutions and get the job done.”

He noted his leadership in proposing a lawsuit against congressional leaders concerning a political deal with Nebraska to support the health care reform bill.

“In Washington, I was the one who led the effort to stop it,” he said. “I don’t believe in stimulus. I don’t believe in bailouts. We’ve thrown a monkey wrench up there.”

Haley said as the next governor she would return the state back to its conservative roots and encourage transparency. She sponsored legislation that would require all statehouse votes to be on record.

“In the statehouse, only 8 percent of votes were on the record,” she said. “We now have an unprecedented number of votes on record now … Politicians have learned a lot of talking points, but they don’t understand the action that goes behind it. It’s time to go to work.”

Barrett said his success at banning partial-birth abortions in South Carolina shows that he is connected with the moral issues that affect South Carolinians.

As governor, he would support an overall tax reform, including sales and property tax, and an emphasis on placing state funds for education in the classroom.

The issue is close to him, because his wife is a first-grade teacher.

“Right now, 44 cents of every dollar goes to education -70 cents of every dollar should go to the classroom,” he said. “We need to focus on reading. If you lose a child in the third grade, they will struggle all their lives.”

Bauer said he would work to cut spending in most programs as a way to improve the state’s economy.

Measures such as placing all senior programs into one agency could cut up to 15 percent in administrative costs, he said.

“One word –priorities. We spend $4 million on a Taj Mahal of a high school football stadium. That shows where we put our priorities,” Bauer said. “It’s not about more money. It’s about being better stewards of our money.”

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deportem
94
Points
deportem 01/18/10 - 05:47 pm
0
0
Throwing more money at

Throwing more money at education will not solve the problem, and only results in higher property taxes. New Jersey is a prime example of how taxpayer's money is being wasted. As a result, New Jersey has the HIGHEST property taxes in the country, and the kids aren't any smarter. Maybe Barrett should move to New Jersey and run for Governor there!

KSL
129652
Points
KSL 01/18/10 - 07:47 pm
0
0
I agree. I think my mother

I agree. I think my mother and my grandparents got more education in the public schools with fewer dollars spent than I did. And that was decades ago. More money does not equal better education. It's all about the allocation of the monies and the dedication of the the teachers and school officials. Discipline enters in also. And stop mainstreaming those who should be in special classes.

crackerjack
150
Points
crackerjack 01/18/10 - 07:54 pm
0
0
Well back then we were doing

Well back then we were doing good to be sent off to school with a biscuit and a piece of fatback. We got one pair of shoes for school, and you go barefooted (yes even in the winter), so you won't mess up your shoes. Near the end of school a hole would show up in the sole of your shoe and I would take the piece of cardboard that comes in dry cleaned shirts to keep the cold out. We didn't have ADD and all this other stuff. It was called daydreaming, and the teacher would whack you if caught. Kids now are just spoiled, and it all started with Dr. Spock.

KSL
129652
Points
KSL 01/18/10 - 08:00 pm
0
0
I bought that silly Spock

I bought that silly Spock book before my first was born. Read a little of it and threw it away. That was in 1969.

msitua
132
Points
msitua 01/19/10 - 12:53 am
0
0
All the posters here don't

All the posters here don't understand a lot about what is happening to our children in this country. One out of every 5 has a learning disability. We didn't have that when we were in school years ago. Autism rates are now 1 in 100 and 1 in every 58 boys. It has nothing to do with spoiling children. We didn't have but 1 in 10,000 children with autism in 1980. ADD and ADHD are considered part of the autism spectrum. These kids are physically sick-not spoiled.
If anyone thinks there is a lack of money in the school system now-just wait a few more years. Who's going to pay for educating the 1 in 20 on the autism spectrum when that occurs
unless soemthing is done to stop all these epidemics-autism, diabetes, asthma, allergies etc.?? Has anyone considered the fact that many of these children will be 18 soon and collecting Social Security for the rest of their lives, unable to care for themselves? When we were in school we didn't get 40 vaccines by age 5. We didn't have genetically modified food, the waters and fish weren't polluted with mercury. Babies here are born with hundreds of toxic chemicals in their bodies-from thier mothers. Infant mortality rate here is very high

msitua
132
Points
msitua 01/19/10 - 12:53 am
0
0
All the posters here don't

All the posters here don't understand a lot about what is happening to our children in this country. One out of every 5 has a learning disability. We didn't have that when we were in school years ago. Autism rates are now 1 in 100 and 1 in every 58 boys. It has nothing to do with spoiling children. We didn't have but 1 in 10,000 children with autism in 1980. ADD and ADHD are considered part of the autism spectrum. These kids are physically sick-not spoiled.
If anyone thinks there is a lack of money in the school system now-just wait a few more years. Who's going to pay for educating the 1 in 20 on the autism spectrum when that occurs
unless soemthing is done to stop all these epidemics-autism, diabetes, asthma, allergies etc.?? Has anyone considered the fact that many of these children will be 18 soon and collecting Social Security for the rest of their lives, unable to care for themselves? When we were in school we didn't get 40 vaccines by age 5. We didn't have genetically modified food, the waters and fish weren't polluted with mercury. Babies here are born with hundreds of toxic chemicals in their bodies-from thier mothers. Infant mortality rate here is very high

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