Revolutionary War hero Pulaski becomes honorary US citizen

Friday, Nov. 6, 2009 9:18 PM
Last updated 9:32 PM
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WASHINGTON — Finally, Gen. Casimir Pulaski became an American, 230 years after the Polish nobleman died in Georgia fighting for what became the United States.

Casimir Pulaski died fighting the British near Savannah during the American Revolution. He is often called the father of the U.S. Cavalry. Middle Georgia's Pulaski County is named for him.  Georgia archives
Georgia archives
Casimir Pulaski died fighting the British near Savannah during the American Revolution. He is often called the father of the U.S. Cavalry. Middle Georgia's Pulaski County is named for him.

President Barack Obama signed a joint resolution today of the Senate and the House of Representatives that made Pulaski an honorary citizen.

Pulaski's contribution to the Americans' effort to leave the British Empire began with a flourish. He wrote a letter to Gen. George Washington, the Revolution's leader, with the declaration: "I came here, where freedom is being defended, to serve it, and to live or die for it."

Democratic Rep. Dennis Kucinich, whose home city of Cleveland, Ohio, has many citizens of Polish extraction, had been pushing for the honorary citizenship since 2005.

"Pulaski made the ultimate sacrifice for this country, and he deserves nothing but the highest honor and recognition for his service," Kucinich said then.

Washington had heard of the young Pole from Benjamin Franklin, who told of Pulaski's exploits that had made him "renowned throughout Europe for the courage and bravery he displayed in defense of his country's freedom."

The revolutionaries' top general let the young nobleman join the brash fight against the European superpower, and Pulaski made a name for himself as a skilled horseman, eventually to be known as the "father of the American cavalry."

He died before the British were driven away. In October 1779, he led a cavalry assault to save the important southern port of Savannah, was wounded and taken aboard the American ship USS Wasp. He died at sea two days later.

Americans have honored Pulaski throughout their two centuries. Counties and streets are named for him, and a statue of Pulaski stands in Buffalo, New York, which has a large Polish population. In 1929 Congress declared Oct. 11 to be Pulaski Day in the United States, a largely forgotten holiday in much of the country. The Continental Congress suggested that a monument erected in honor of Pulaski, and in 1825 it finally was erected in Savannah, Georgia.

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SayNoMore
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SayNoMore 11/06/09 - 10:45 pm
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While this honor is certainly

While this honor is certainly well deserved, it might have been nice to set aside stuff like this on Capitol Hill today to remember the fallen at Fort Hood. The proclamation honoring the NY Yankees baseball team that was also issued today was totally disrespectful in my opinion.

Justthefacts please
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Justthefacts please 11/06/09 - 10:48 pm
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As a long-time student of our

As a long-time student of our nation's history I came to know and admire Gen. Pulaski as an 8th grader. He became one of my heroes and remains so to this day. God blees Gen. Pulaski and God bless Poland, a nation that has always stood with Americans in our battle to remain free. Enjoy our freedoms now because when the Democrats finish with us we will all be wearing arm braceletes and tatoos. Truly, Democrats are a people without souls, willing to be led like sheep to the slaughter. We need more Pulaskis and less Democrats. Oh by the way, the Republicans aren't any better.

30cal
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30cal 11/07/09 - 01:21 pm
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how much they care for our

how much they care for our fallen troops , it is SAD(stronger language not allowed here.) as for the pulaski thing its about the Polish vote not a( AS WE ALL KNOW) fallen trooper

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