Police chase ends in fatalities

Sunday, Oct. 11, 2009 9:18 AM
Last updated 8:39 PM
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RINCON, Ga. — A second man has died after a high-speed police chase near Savannah.

Effingham County Sheriff's spokesman David Ehsanipoor said Georgia State Patrol troopers and sheriff's deputies began following a vehicle with two people in it in Chatham County late Saturday night.

The chase extended into Effingham County, where deputies used spike strips to flatten the car's tires. The car lost control, hitting another vehicle.

Both suspects died in the wreck. Police have not released their names.

Police say the suspects also hit two other vehicles during the chase, injuring two people. Their names and conditions were not immediately available.

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odomkw
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odomkw 10/11/09 - 10:16 am
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Why not just get the tag

Why not just get the tag number and pick them up at there house, innocent people always caught in the cross fire of a bad situation that could have been avoided. was the high speed chase worth a Life I dont think so.

waugusta92
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waugusta92 10/11/09 - 10:21 am
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agreed odomkw. unless someone

agreed odomkw. unless someone in the car is at risk, pick up the plate #, send it to the county they're headed to and fall back. watch it be for something idiotic like stealing a cd player from wal-mart (such as a previous incident in augusta) or the smell of marijuana in the car. it just isn't worth it.

KSL
135437
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KSL 10/11/09 - 10:37 am
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And you would make a case

And you would make a case against who after the fact? The only thing the tag number proves is who the car is registered to.

andywarhol
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andywarhol 10/11/09 - 10:38 am
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Yeah, just like the recent

Yeah, just like the recent robbery where the victim got the tag number only to discover it was stolen. Criminals are idiots, but not completely stupid. If there was a no chase law, I'd run every time.

KSL
135437
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KSL 10/11/09 - 10:39 am
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If criminals KNOW they will

If criminals KNOW they will not be pursued, well, it's will be just like where they know law abiding citizens don't have guns. Check out the crime rate in Australia since the banning of guns.

hickstreetlane
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hickstreetlane 10/11/09 - 10:43 am
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Maybe the car was stolen.

Maybe the car was stolen. Getting the tag numbers would be useless then. Agree if the charge was minor, but there no indication what the charges were.

overburdened_taxpayer
117
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overburdened_taxpayer 10/11/09 - 11:02 am
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You never know, the charge

You never know, the charge could be that it was a stolen car.

mad_max
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mad_max 10/11/09 - 11:07 am
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Many of the crooks and drug

Many of the crooks and drug dealers are running with stolen plates. Just like a day or so ago, the mall security person got the plate of the shoplifters car that hit them but it came back to a different vehicle. And the fact is that the more of them you "let" run, the more of them will try running and the more of them will steal tags so that they cannot be traced. Think about it people. The real answer is that the cops should be instructed to immediately PIT thise cars and end the chase and should be authorized to shoot if needed to stop the chase. If you run from the cops you are, by default, a FELON or an IDIOT and will not be missed by society in either case. You should be encouraging the cops to take positive action to stop the runners instead of encouraging the runners to give it a try. Car chases were almost unheard of until we came up with the "let 'em go" policy and now the runners know they have a 20% chance of getting away based on a recent study of CA car chases and the theft of license plates is skyrocketing.

RoadkiII
6787
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RoadkiII 10/11/09 - 11:11 am
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OK, say I am a crook, I don't

OK, say I am a crook, I don't even have to steal a car, just steal the license plate. Cops can no longer chase me and go to the home of the person that the tag was stolen from. Meanwhile I am making a good living as a retailer of stolen goods. Yep, makes perfect sense to me.

Craig Spinks
817
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Craig Spinks 10/11/09 - 11:21 am
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"(M)ad (M)ax" doesn't sound

"(M)ad (M)ax" doesn't sound too mad to me. So long as most of us adhere to the "anti-authority" and "if-it-doesn't-affect-me-directly-and-substantially, I-don't-want-to-get-involved" philosophies, we'll have more folks driving recklessly on our roads, running from the police, pushing drugs to our kids at school, leaving children to fend for themselves, dropping out of school, etc. Think about what MM has to say.

andywarhol
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andywarhol 10/11/09 - 11:43 am
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KSL, many anti-gun activists

KSL, many anti-gun activists know nothing or are too stupid to pay attention to the known results of where this has been done before. If I remember correctly, violent crimes and robberies with the possession of firearms have risen over 400% in Australia after the banning of legal firearms.

Asitisinaug
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Asitisinaug 10/11/09 - 11:52 am
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Police chases are and evil

Police chases are and evil necessity. The individual who does not wish to be caught will run, period. Generally speaking, he/she has more to hide than the mere infraction the deputy is looking for. For example, many "small smells of marijuana" have led to arrests with major amounts of drugs. Even chases which resulted do to mere traffic violations have neted everything from drug dealers to murderers. And, if you attempt to stop them and they speed off, most likely they will continue to speed for a good ways and still could cause an accident but if you let them go, they then continue to peddle their illegal drugs, break into homes, commit robberies, or drive inappropriately so there is no logic to letting them run and catching them later. The next time you attempt to catch them, they will most likely run as well or you may end up with a hostage situation at the home or a stand off so either way, the police will be critized instead a squarely placing all of the blame where it belongs - on the criminal. We do not need to allow criminals to do as they please and police are using many new techniques to slow or end chases but to stop pursuits is bad for all of us in the long run.

placid
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placid 10/11/09 - 11:54 am
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Andywarhol, I read this about

Andywarhol, I read this about Australia: "Between 1991 and 2001, the number of firearm related deaths in Australia declined 47%."

"In 1997, the Prime Minister appointed the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) to monitor the effects of the gun buyback. The AIC have published a number of papers reporting trends and statistics around gun ownership and gun crime, which they have found to be mostly related to illegally-held firearms.[19][24] In 2002 the AIC announced that they had proof of many lives saved, but their paper which was released months later demonstrated only continuing downtrends in gun deaths since many years before the buyback.[25]
In 2000, the American National Rifle Association claimed that violent crimes had increased in Australia since the introduction of new laws based on some highly selective statistics from newspaper articles. Federal Attorney General Daryl Williams accused the NRA of falsifying government statistics and urged the NRA to "remove any reference to Australia" from its website"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Australia

ColdBeerBoiledPeanuts
9338
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ColdBeerBoiledPeanuts 10/11/09 - 12:03 pm
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And anyone can contribute

And anyone can contribute anything to wikipedia without confirmation of truth!!

MrAlwaysRight
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MrAlwaysRight 10/11/09 - 12:07 pm
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CBBP: I once changed the

CBBP: I once changed the definition of moron to Rose on Wikki. Took them over a day to fix it.

ColdBeerBoiledPeanuts
9338
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ColdBeerBoiledPeanuts 10/11/09 - 12:19 pm
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Ah, but CEIT, that was a

Ah, but CEIT, that was a truth unto itself. You are a true Jedi warrior!!

RoadkiII
6787
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RoadkiII 10/11/09 - 12:20 pm
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Wikipedia, a place where I

Wikipedia, a place where I can be king of the world! OOPS, I forgot, that position is taken.

justus4
107
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justus4 10/11/09 - 12:39 pm
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What was the original
Unpublished

What was the original justification for the contact? Why does this foolishness continue to happen? We have terrible crimes that happen WITH these car chases, so what horrible result will happen if this reckless behavior is terminated? We will still have terrible crimes, except no deaths would be caused by police forced high-speed crashes. Thats a good thing! But some will say, "the criminals will start taking over" Ha! Not true. Lets use come common sense, or is that too much to ask?

shadypines
7
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shadypines 10/11/09 - 12:39 pm
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If a person runs, they

If a person runs, they obviously have a reason to run. Whether it is because they have outstanding warrants or because they know they're going to get caught with drugs or guns in their vehicle. As for picking them up at their house later based on the tag number, that is absolutely ridiculous, and you have obviously never worked around criminals or dishonest people before. Assuming the tag even came back as being registered to that particular vehicle, all the person has to do is say "It wasn't me inside the car. I don't know what you're talking about." Even if the police have a photograph of that person inside the car and behind the wheel, they can still say "That ain't me." and get away with it at trial. Don't believe me? Check out the facts of the R. Kelly child pornography trial.

Riverman1
87451
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Riverman1 10/11/09 - 12:52 pm
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Fact is most runners do not

Fact is most runners do not have serious charges. We have a long discussion on here everytime this happens. I've looked up these stats. High speed pursuits end in injuries about half the time. The injuries are either to the runner, the innocent public or to the OFFICERS. There are organizations comprised of the families of innocent bystanders who have been killed due to high speed chases. They are adamant that unless the officer had reason to believe a violent felony is being committed, he should not chase at high speed.

RAWR
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RAWR 10/11/09 - 01:01 pm
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Odom the article did not

Odom the article did not state what they were getting chased for. So how could you come to the decision that they shouldve gotten the tag and found them later? There is this organ called the brain. Please learn how to use yours.

RoadkiII
6787
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RoadkiII 10/11/09 - 01:03 pm
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Just curious, how do you know

Just curious, how do you know a felony is not or has been commited untill you stop them. Could be a drug dealer, a fleeing felon, parolee breaking conditions of parole, or any number of things. Bottom line is if I want to get drunk and drive, I steal the tags off of any available vehicle, when the blue lights come on I run. Cops go to somebody elses house and I go home to do it again. It would be the same with any crime.

Riverman1
87451
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Riverman1 10/11/09 - 01:43 pm
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Roadkill, you don't know, but

Roadkill, you don't know, but the point is that the greatest number of those who run are not committing violent felonies. In jurisdictions where there are no high speed pursuits, the rate of those who run doesn't increase. Again, keep in mind, about half of these pursuits will end in an accident with injuries. Most law abiding citizens do pull over for blue lights. Someone doesn't suddenly become a runner because there is a policy of no high speed chases.

Ushouldnthave
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Ushouldnthave 10/11/09 - 01:43 pm
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I say let 'em all go. Make

I say let 'em all go. Make them move to that backwards SC town where the mayor outlawed the police from foot chases. At least then when they kill or rob YOUR family, you can't blame the cops. Idiocracy rules!!!!

RoadkiII
6787
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RoadkiII 10/11/09 - 01:52 pm
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Riverman I can beleive that,

Riverman I can beleive that, since law abiding citizens will stop. And the runners run run run away, to commit a crime another day

Riverman1
87451
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Riverman1 10/11/09 - 01:53 pm
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The facts are those who run

The facts are those who run are usually young speeders who are not committing serious felonies. Remember about a year ago, an officer stopped the guy on Broad St. and had the guy's license in his hand when the guy decided to run. The officer even suggested simply picking up the guy later. I'm not sure who initiated the high speed chase, but it ended with the death of an innocent person on Gordon Hwy.

RoadkiII
6787
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RoadkiII 10/11/09 - 01:59 pm
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Yep, young speeders like Jed

Yep, young speeders like Jed

butler123
1
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butler123 10/11/09 - 02:14 pm
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I don't the cops did the

I don't the cops did the wrong thing. They did the right thing at the wrong time. There shouldn't have been any other cars in sight. I feel for the innocent victims and the cops involved. They have to live with thier decision.

Riverman1
87451
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Riverman1 10/11/09 - 02:17 pm
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Sure a high speed pursuit

Sure a high speed pursuit policy is harder on the officers than anyone. Before we jump to conclusions, here is a link for a story that describes the problem well. Think about it. http://www.policedriving.com/article78.htm

Riverman1
87451
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Riverman1 10/11/09 - 02:20 pm
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From the above link:

From the above link: "Officers from a few departments that have restrictive policies -- which allow chases only for violent crimes and require involvement of supervisors -- say their policies are working. We've had terrific success with our new pursuit policy," said Capt. Paul Rooney, whose Orlando Police Department adopted a new policy in March. "I think it's the model policy for the country....In St. Louis County, Mo., where a restrictive policy has been in place about 10 years, the department has simply found safer ways to chase bad guys than to chase them in cars, said Maj. Timothy Fitch."

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