Richmond County School Board addressing furlough days

Monday, Oct. 5, 2009 2:08 PM
Last updated 4:25 PM
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The Richmond County School Board will hold a called meeting at 4 p.m. today to discuss the issue of teachers and counselors taking time off in light of a pay decrease this year equivalent to five furlough days.

Louis Svehla, spokesman for the Richmond County School System, said Superintendent Dana Bedden will offer a recommendation to the board today on when such workers can take time off. Mr. Svehla said he's not sure how many days that might involve.

Mr. Svehla said that initially when teachers had their pay cut there was discussion that at a later date officials would look at giving teachers time off.

Since then, Dr. Bedden has allowed teachers to cut their day short 15 minutes. Now. Mr. Svehla said the school system is readdressing its earlier discussion of allowing more time off.

"There has always been a plan to find ways to allow them to take off," he said.

Earlier in the year, he said there was uneasiness as to whether more cuts might be coming from the state. Now, he said some uneasiness remains, but officials feel they're in a better spot to offer more time off.

Also at today's meeting will be a discussion of school bus driver furloughs and a personnel grievance hearing. Today's meeting is at the school board's meeting room on Broad Street.

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PositiveThinker
0
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PositiveThinker 10/05/09 - 02:15 pm
0
0
Dr. Bedden, thank you for

Dr. Bedden, thank you for your hard work and dedication to Richmond County. You are extremely qualified and could get a superintendent job just about anywhere... but as a citizen of Richmond County, I truly appreciate your dedication to making our schools and community better.

Frank I
1208
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Frank I 10/05/09 - 03:17 pm
0
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will Dr. Bedden also be

will Dr. Bedden also be discussing taking a pay cut for himself, and taking furlough days as well?

Dudeness
1546
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Dudeness 10/05/09 - 03:43 pm
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I don't know of a single

I don't know of a single teacher who has been able to leave 15 minutes early. They're working just as long or longer for less pay due to these "furloughs".

Waymore
114
Points
Waymore 10/05/09 - 03:46 pm
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Still waiting to see when

Still waiting to see when welfare recipients and those getting a "free" college education via government handouts will be getting furloughed..

AugustaVoter
1
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AugustaVoter 10/05/09 - 03:56 pm
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My wife is a teacher and

My wife is a teacher and dudeness you are absolutely correct. They still have staff meetings lasting 1 1/2 hours past school times and some teachers with morning duties report 30 minutes early and still get off late. They should just make all teachers salary exempt employees and be done with it. Then you can cut salaries without the "appearance" that they are getting time off.

TrueVoice
22
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TrueVoice 10/05/09 - 04:49 pm
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Are we forgetting that they

Are we forgetting that they get paid year round? I work 240 days a year compared to the 180 they work. Check out the posted salaries for Richmond and Columbia county teachers. You can find the link on the Chronicle. Some teachers are getting paid $60-$90 an hour! If the students were performing well I'd say fine. However, they are not.

sugar babe 74
0
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sugar babe 74 10/05/09 - 05:05 pm
0
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are teachers really getting

are teachers really getting paid that much an hour?

workingmom
0
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workingmom 10/05/09 - 05:06 pm
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There is no way a teacher can

There is no way a teacher can leave school 15 minutes early most days. As for teachers' salaries, they are only paid for the 190 they work. Their salary is just divided into 12 months so they do not do without a paycheck in the summer months.

gaflyboy
6054
Points
gaflyboy 10/05/09 - 05:21 pm
0
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PositiveThinker: I agree that

PositiveThinker: I agree that Dr. Bedden was sent to Richmond County just in time. He's doing a great job under very difficult circumstances.

FrankI: Yes, he has taken a pay cut as well.

Dudeness: You're absolutely right. They are working harder & longer for less.

TrueVoice: It must be nice to blurt out anything you want in total ignorance. They are paid for the time worked (most of it), but the pay is pro-rated out for the year. They are not paid enough!

mystery30815
18
Points
mystery30815 10/05/09 - 06:42 pm
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Perhaps students will start

Perhaps students will start performing well when parents are also held accountable for their childs performance? What if cash aid and food stamps were tied into the childs attendance and academic progress? Perhaps then students would perform better. I am stating that all teachers are wonderful, but the majority are great teachers. Learning is not something that is done to you. You have to participate to learn. All of these people need to step into the classroom at the middle and high school level and see how these students act on a daily basis. It's pitiful.

mystery30815
18
Points
mystery30815 10/05/09 - 06:45 pm
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Truevoice, how much of your

Truevoice, how much of your own $ do you spend on basic supplies necessary to do your job? How about the state is requiring labs to be completed once a week in Science classes but not giving any extra money to purchase the supplies needed. Teachers often spend hours at the end of the work day tutoring students who need extra help. They are there early leave late. If you added up the hours work it far surpasses 190 days. On top of that, you had the choice to go into teaching, for whatever reason, you chose not to.

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