Sparks from vehicle likely cause of brush fire

Friday, July 3, 2009 6:34 PM
Last updated 11:35 PM
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Forestry officials believe a fire that burned more than 200 acres in Aiken County on Thursday may have been started by a vehicle “throwing sparks” as it traveled down the road.

Scott Hawkins, spokesman for the South Carolina Forestry Commission, said today that there were multiple points of ignition along the roadway, which typically means a vehicle created the sparks.

“That could be having a chain on a trailer drag or sparks flying off a piece of metal like a muffler,” Mr. Hawkins said. “These things happen a lot along the road and generally that’s what’s done it.”

The brush fire was contained to an area off Snipes Pond Road on Thursday night and Mr. Hawkins said its likely to remain that way for several days.

“It still might generate heat inside the lines but it's not growing in size at all,” he said.

A “skeleton crew” of firemen will monitor the site over the weekend, according to Aiken County Sheriff’s Sgt. Dave Myers.

About 45 firefighters from several agencies spent the day fighting the fires that threatened, but did not damage, nearby homes. One firefighter suffered minor burns and two were treated for heat exhaustion on Thursday.

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Nammy3
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Nammy3 07/03/09 - 07:23 pm
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Some ciggy butt.....Thanks

Some ciggy butt.....Thanks for putting it out. I'm sure the homeowners feel blessed.

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