Coming Sunday: A local study looks at python migration

Saturday, June 27, 2009 11:46 AM
Last updated 11:33 PM
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Here come the pythons.

J.D. Willson  with the University of Georgia and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory watches a Burmese Python slither into brush after realeasing it in a specially designed snake enclosure at SREL Saturday June 27, 2009. A chip has been implanted in the snakes and they will be tracked and studied for a year.  Chris Thelen/staff
Chris Thelen/staff
J.D. Willson with the University of Georgia and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory watches a Burmese Python slither into brush after realeasing it in a specially designed snake enclosure at SREL Saturday June 27, 2009. A chip has been implanted in the snakes and they will be tracked and studied for a year.

Yes, many of those really big snakes - once the most exotic of pets -- have slithered into the wilds of Florida. And just like fire ants and armadillos, scientists are afraid they could eventually migrate to Georgia.

Coming Sunday, we report on the Savannah River Ecology Lab's effort to study how big, cold-blooded snakes could make it this far north.

Don't say we didn't warn you.

Read all about it on Sunday.

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storiesihaveread
358
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storiesihaveread 06/27/09 - 01:52 pm
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Riverman1
90619
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Riverman1 06/27/09 - 10:18 pm
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I live on the river, make my

I live on the river, make my day.

dashiel
176
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dashiel 06/27/09 - 10:33 pm
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The ones in Florida eat dogs

The ones in Florida eat dogs and cats.

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