Georgia reports swine flu case

Thursday, April 30, 2009 11:23 AM
Last updated Friday, Jan. 8, 2010 1:24 PM
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Georgia's first confirmed swine flu case is a 30-year-old Kentucky woman who first felt ill vacationing in Mexico and was hospitalized a week later after attending a wedding, state health officials said Thursday.

This 2009 image taken through a microscope and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, shows a negative-stained image of the swine flu virus.  Associated Press
Associated Press
This 2009 image taken through a microscope and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, shows a negative-stained image of the swine flu virus.

The case was confirmed by the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Elizabeth Ford, head of Georgia's Division of Public Health, said at a news conference that the woman had traveled to Cancun, Mexico earlier this month. The woman then went home to Kentucky before traveling to western Georgia for a wedding. The woman is from Bowling Green, said Gwenda Bond, spokeswoman for the Kentucky Department of Public Health.

The friend who traveled with the woman to Mexico, as well as friends and family who were with her in Georgia, have shown no swine flu symptoms and have received anti-viral treatments, Ford said. That includes the woman's 5-year-old daughter, who was in the car with her as she drove from Kentucky to Georgia.

The woman was admitted to West Georgia Medical System in LaGrange on Sunday with "flu-like symptoms," said medical system president and CEO Jerry Fulks. She has been treated in isolation in a "negative pressure room," which means the air is sucked out of the room through filters to remove airborne pathogens, Fulks said. Nurses and doctors caring for her are wearing masks, gloves and gowns.

Fulks described her condition Thursday afternoon as "stable."

"She is beginning to show some modest signs of improvement," he said. "But she is still very seriously ill."

The woman arrived in Mexico on April 17. She began to feel ill the next day - with fever, chills and headache - but initially thought it was because she'd gotten too much sun. She flew home to Kentucky on April 21. Two days later, she drove to Atlanta, where she shopped on April 23 and 24. She went to LaGrange for the rehearsal dinner on Saturday and to the wedding on Sunday. She went to the emergency room later that day.

Health officials are contacting people who were at the wedding to let them know they may have been exposed to swine flu, and the CDC is doing a flight investigation to notify people who may have been on the same flights back from Mexico, Ford said. Officials said they don't know where she shopped or stayed in Atlanta and aren't making any effort to contact people who may have come into contact with her here.

They encourage people who experience flu-like symptoms to see a doctor.

The state lab was still awaiting test results Thursday afternoon from 24 other cases that could be swine flu.

"We are being very mindful of trying to contain the level of panic," Ford said. There were no immediate plans to close schools or cancel public gatherings, she said.

Ford added that people should take the same precautions they would take during the normal flu season: wash hands often, cover their sneezes and stay home from school or work if they feel sick.

Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue also urged people not to panic.

"The State of Georgia has worked diligently over the past several years to prepare for a situation like this, and we are partnering with local and federal officials to respond appropriately," he said in a statement.

The World Health Organization has raised its alert level to Phase 5, the second-highest, indicating a pandemic may be imminent.

Swine flu has symptoms nearly identical to regular flu - fever, cough and sore throat - and spreads like regular flu, through tiny particles in the air, when people cough or sneeze.

People with flu symptoms are advised to stay at home, wash their hands and cover their sneezes.

The CDC is reporting 109 confirmed cases in 11 states. Georgia's case is no included in those counts.

Comments (14) Add comment
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Slavicthunder
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Slavicthunder 04/30/09 - 11:39 am
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Shoot her. It stops the

Shoot her. It stops the spread.

itisjustmyopinion
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itisjustmyopinion 04/30/09 - 11:47 am
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you are stupid

you are stupid

3M3T1B
7
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3M3T1B 04/30/09 - 11:55 am
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Should be SlavicDunder

Should be SlavicDunder

soldout
1280
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soldout 04/30/09 - 01:07 pm
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Dr Robert O Young gives a

Dr Robert O Young gives a different view when cdc states that the Mexican Swine Flu Virus is a potential pandemic and can kill you. "This is a scientific illusion. Viruses do not kill, acids kill. All viruses are nothing more than dietary and/or metabolic acid. The word virus in Latin means poison or acid. All flu's or acids by definition effect only the gastrointestinal tract due to acidic foods and drinks ingested - not viruses. So the Mexican Swine Flu Virus that has been reported to have killed over 1000 Mexicans is the result of an excess of gastrointestinal acid from the ingestion of acidic foods and drinks that have not been properly buffered by the stomach with alkaline salts or eliminated through the four channels of elimination - lungs, bowels, bladder and/or skin. For these Mexicans or others in the US or around the world that have died, the cause of death was due to an excess of acidic foods and drinks, including Tequila, beer, beans, rice, corn, peanuts, yeast, soy sauce, high sugar fruit, processed sugar, artificial sugar, dairy products, chicken, turkey, beef and the biggest acid of all - SWINE. That's right, the acids from PORK can kill".

Why ME
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Why ME 04/30/09 - 01:23 pm
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So soldout, would this be a

So soldout, would this be a racially biased virus and/or acid?

soldout
1280
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soldout 04/30/09 - 01:33 pm
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I don't know but certain

I don't know but certain races like certain foods more than others I guess. I think getting a healthy immune system makes you more alkaline and less acid just like stress and worry make you acidic and more likely to get sick. There is a Bible verse than says "the thing I feared has come upon me" and there is a scientific reason for that happening. The more folks worry and fret over this the more lilkely they can get sick.

cobweb
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cobweb 04/30/09 - 04:07 pm
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Robert Young is not a medical

Robert Young is not a medical doctor

gabassist
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gabassist 04/30/09 - 04:21 pm
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"Dr." Young's statements will

"Dr." Young's statements will also disappoint the thousands of virologists who have spent their lifetimes cultivating and studying viruses of all types, including the influenza virus! To think that all those years were wasted working with little particles, when all they needed was a good antacid!

mad_max
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mad_max 04/30/09 - 05:33 pm
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Dr. Robert Young. He is one

Dr. Robert Young. He is one of those fruitcakes who tells people with cancer not to take their chemotherapy and just do his diet instead. Note the words "unaccredited distance learning school". "He received several degrees from Clayton College of Natural Health, an unaccredited distance learning school, including an M.S. in nutrition (1993), a D.Sc. with emphasis in chemistry and biology (1995), a Ph.D. (1997) and an N.D. (Doctor of Naturopathy, 1999)." The "distance" was mostly between Young and the "learning".

soldout
1280
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soldout 04/30/09 - 06:23 pm
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Now the question becomes, is

Now the question becomes, is he telling the truth? The truth is the truth no matter where it comes from. The source of truth doesn't determine truth.

soldout
1280
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soldout 04/30/09 - 06:46 pm
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the alternatives doctors did

the alternatives doctors did a great job in 1918 on the flu situation

http://www.nesh.com/main/nejh/samples/winston.html

RexHavoc
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RexHavoc 04/30/09 - 08:55 pm
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Sonny's a little late; the

Sonny's a little late; the news media's been telling us to panic for a week now. There are no solutions, mind you; no FEMA being dispatched, no hospitals ER's being staffed. Just "wash your hands and don't kiss Mexicans".

Rolling Eyes
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Rolling Eyes 04/30/09 - 11:07 pm
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So Soldout, what you are

So Soldout, what you are telling me is to stock up on sugar free Tums to fight the flu? ;-)

Tujeez1
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Tujeez1 05/01/09 - 04:13 am
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Well, I'll be damned!

Well, I'll be damned! Somebody kissed the Talking Pig!

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