Virginia reports fireball, 'boom' similar to Augusta's on March 20

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AIKEN - Reports of another boom and fireball over the skies of Virginia Sunday night a week after a similar incident in Augusta have some asking if there is a connection.

But Dr. Gary Senn, of the Dupont Planetarium at the University of South Carolina Aiken's Ruth Patrick Science Education Center, says there's no need to worry.

At least so far, he said, the incidents fall within the realm of statistics, with sightings of meteors occurring about a couple times a month somewhere in the U.S.

Larger incidents involving booms that shake homes are less common, occurring about a couple times a year.

"It's a little unusual, but not unheard of," he said of having two large meteor-like incidents occur just a few states away and within a week and a half.

"...So I'm not ready to say the sky's falling."

Dr. Senn said there isn't any evidence at this point of increased meteor activity. He said if more such incidents occur in a short time frame, he then might need to reevaluate the situation.

At this point, he said he feels such incidents have been brought into the spotlight more so recently with some recent cases generating interest. Recently, officials reported finding a meteorite in the Sudan that had been tracked from outer space - considered a first. And then there was the March 20 incident in Augusta, which has brought meteorite hunters to the area offering a reward. In that case, residents reported hearing a loud boom and some saw a large fireball.

Dr. Senn said he's even heard some question whether the recent events are the result of a previous collision between two satellites, but "I don't think that's what it is."

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KingJames
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KingJames 03/31/09 - 10:19 am
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According to scientists at

According to scientists at the Naval Observatory, the object in the sky over Virginia was space junk from a Russian Soyuz rocket that docked at the International Space Station on Saturday. Scientists at the Observatory think that it was probably a rocket boster falling from the Soyuz, that it was completely burned up over the ocean, and that it never struck Earth.

FallingLeaves
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FallingLeaves 03/31/09 - 12:32 pm
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KingJames is right, I read

KingJames is right, I read the article about that possibility on the Augusta Forums of the Augusta Chronicle earlier this morning. Very good article link there, but you can probably google it quickly with above keywords, since I'm running late and can't look it up right now. Just keep in mind, it hasn't been confirmed.

asustudent8824
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asustudent8824 03/31/09 - 01:12 pm
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i thought the end of the

i thought the end of the world was scheduled for dec. 22, 2012... not march 31, 2009

Signal Always
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Signal Always 03/31/09 - 01:27 pm
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All caused by global warming.

All caused by global warming.

humbleopinion
1
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humbleopinion 03/31/09 - 06:54 pm
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Nope, it's Bush's fault.

Nope, it's Bush's fault.

patriciathomas
42
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patriciathomas 03/31/09 - 07:37 pm
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All Bush did was move a

All Bush did was move a little weather around. O is bringing meteorites down on us.

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