Former school leader in Glynn investigated for sex solicitation

  • Follow Latest News

BRUNSWICK, Ga. - A state agency that oversees educators will investigate fired Glynn County schools Superintendent Michael Bull's use of a school system BlackBerry to solicit sex over the Internet.

The Georgia Professional Standards Commission can impose sanctions ranging from a warning to revocation of an educator's state certification.

The Glynn County school board fired Mr. Bull on Feb. 20 after it learned he had used the BlackBerry to send and receive sexually explicit e-mail on Feb. 18 while staying at a Savannah motel for a regional education meeting in Statesboro, more than 50 miles away.

By law, the school board was required to notify the commission of Mr. Bull's termination, which it said was for cause - improper use of school property. Bull is accused of violating state educator ethics standards by misusing school property and by unprofessional conduct in the matter, according to a complaint included in the notification.

During its regular meeting Thursday, the commission agreed to investigate, said Gary Walker, director of its Educator Ethics Division.

The commission only has authority in Georgia, but it reports any disciplinary action it takes to a nationwide education database.

Mr. Bull will have an opportunity to respond to the complaint and present evidence on his own behalf during a subsequent hearing. He can appeal any disciplinary action.

Comments (5) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 03/13/09 - 10:06 am
0
0
I'm sure that Dr. Bull is

I'm sure that Dr. Bull is scared to death of Gary and his GPSC "investigators." When I reported a certain former local county school superintendent to the GPSC for failing to report certain subordinates who had failed to report allegations of child abuse by a substitute teacher who later pled guilty to a reduced charge, I was subjected to such an inquisition at the hands of a GPSC "investigator," I was not surprised when the GPSC found no evidence of wrongdoing by the former SOS. My impression of the entire GPSC "investigative" process was pregnant with reminders of what I had apparently incorrectly believed was a defunct "good ole boy" system.. One question: Was this abuse of county property not criminal? Was a criminal report filed with the Chatham County Sheriff's Office?

shamrock
470
Points
shamrock 03/13/09 - 11:48 am
0
0
He'll probably get a

He'll probably get a promotion!

jack
10
Points
jack 03/13/09 - 11:55 am
0
0
Mr Spinks, and investigation,

Mr Spinks, and investigation, if properly conducted, gets as much "evidence" as possible concerning the allegatins/charges, thus your "inquisition".

CoastalDawg
125
Points
CoastalDawg 03/13/09 - 12:32 pm
0
0
"and investigation" - could

"and investigation" - could this be "AN investigation"? And surely "allegatins/charges? MUST mean allegations/charges. Remember now this is a story about an EDUCATOR so all posts need to exhibit good spelling and grammar . . . .

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 03/13/09 - 02:57 pm
0
0
(J)ack, I worked for the GDC

(J)ack, I worked for the GDC for almost 9 years and have been deposed in a lawsuit wherein I was the plaintiff. I can differentiate between an investigation and an inquisition. The GPSC employee who questioned me behaved like a modern-day Torquemada. I got the distinct impression that he thought his inquisitorial tactics would motivate me to withdraw my allegations and forget the whole thing. He wasn't too smart, was he?

Back to Top

Top headlines

Paine plans furloughs, salary cuts, layoffs

Paine College President George C. Bradley on Friday announced the college will implement furlough days, salary reductions and layoffs to save $2.4 million over the next fiscal year.
Search Augusta jobs