Parties expect judge to approve settlement in James Brown case

Thursday, Jan. 29, 2009 3:00 PM
Last updated Wednesday, July 9, 2014 7:12 PM
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Attorneys involved in the legal battle over James Brown's estate say a South Carolina judge could soon decide on a settlement that would end the fight over how to parcel out the singer's wealth.

A hearing in Aiken County Friday will center on a long-awaited settlement. It would give 50 percent to Brown's charitable trust to educate needy students; 25 percent to a woman claiming to be Brown's surviving spouse; and 25 percent to some of Brown's adult children.

Louis Levenson, an attorney for some of Brown's children, said the judge will likely give a decision on the settlement during the hearing.

Brown died in an Atlanta hospital Christmas Day 2006. For more than two years now, claims of unpaid debts, inadequate accounting and misappropriated funds have thrown into turmoil the soul singer's estate.

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Does_it_really_matter
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Does_it_really_matter 01/29/09 - 04:26 pm
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Thank God

Thank God

augusta9696
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augusta9696 01/29/09 - 08:42 pm
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James Brown's family could

James Brown's family could walk out of court on Friday with a brand new deal. If approved by a judge in South Carolina, a settlement over the late soul singer's estate would end a two-year legal saga.

Attorneys say it would divide Brown's remaining assets and give his beneficiaries the ability to make money using his music and likeness.

Half of Brown's assets would go to his charitable trust to educate his grandchildren and needy students in Georgia and South Carolina. The rest would be split between his surviving spouse and some of Brown's adult children.

It's a contrast to the instructions spelled out in Brown's will and trust filed less than a month after his death on Christmas Day 2006, but lawyers said they're done fighting over what many say is very little remaining cash.

The exact value of Brown's assets has not been made public during the numerous court hearings that have featured claims of unpaid debts, inadequate accounting and misappropriated money.

"Rather than take the delay, rather than pay the cost and rather than risk an all-o

augusta9696
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augusta9696 01/29/09 - 08:43 pm
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Brown, whose body remained

Brown, whose body remained unburied for nearly three months, was interred March 10, 2007, at the Beech Island home of one of his daughters. His children have said through an attorney they plan to turn home into a Graceland-like museum and build a mausoleum for his body.

Attorneys say Brown's assets will return to profitability through movies, song royalties and the sale of Brown's likeness. Levenson said projects are in the works but has declined to elaborate.

Rosen said Brown's legacy could use some repairing as well.

"All of this fighting has hurt the estate. There's been really nobody out there helping to promote James Brown as he should have been and I think that's a real tragedy," Rosen said. "It's just too bad that all of this has happened. I'm hoping that it can end Friday."

Not surprisingly, after months of contention, the disagreements will not likely end in court: In recent days, people who worked for Brown have said he wouldn't have agreed with the settlement

augusta9696
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augusta9696 01/29/09 - 08:44 pm
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Not surprisingly, after

Not surprisingly, after months of contention, the disagreements will not likely end in court: In recent days, people who worked for Brown have said he wouldn't have agreed with the settlement.

Longtime Brown attorney and former trustee Buddy Dallas said Brown was adamant about when he asked what Brown was planning to do for his children.

"He came around the desk at me with his finger in my face and he said, 'Let me tell you something, Mr. Dallas. They are not going to live on my back when I'm gone.'" Dallas said. "Mr. Brown would not be a happy man."

Former Brown publicist Jacque Hollander said Brown often talked of leaving his money to needy children, first mentioning that plan in the early 1980s.

Her now-dropped lawsuit claiming Brown raped her in 1988 makes her and Dallas, former adversaries, unlikely allies in claiming that Brown didn't want his adult children to get his money.

augusta9696
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augusta9696 01/29/09 - 08:45 pm
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But Hollander said she's put

But Hollander said she's put her differences with Brown aside for the moment to speak up for who she calls the true beneficiaries of Brown's estate.

"He'd say, 'For the kids,'" said Hollander, who on Friday hopes to speak in court against the settlement. "Nobody was going to tell him what to do with his money

augusta9696
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augusta9696 01/29/09 - 08:45 pm
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Post it all please,

Post it all please, augusta,chronicle.

Nammy
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Nammy 01/30/09 - 03:46 am
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You did for them but you

You did for them but you should site your source...

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