Mammogram guidelines are outrageous

  • Follow Letters

After Breast Cancer Awareness Month, countless articles and reflections with personal stories of breast cancer survivors in The Augusta Chronicle and even a pink newspaper, I read this Chronicle headline recently: "Guidelines say delay mammograms."

Should women, especially, take comfort in knowing a government task force claims breast self-exams do no good? Is this one of the new government medical programs that may be in control of our health care?

It just goes to prove the old saying: Believe half of what you read and none of what you hear. I hope that many people write in who have survived breast cancer because of early detection to contradict this latest "research" -- not to mention relatives of those who have died from breast cancer at the ages of 30 to 50.

When reading a news article that seems so ridiculous and out of the realm of common sense or even contrary, nine times out of 10 you can bet a pizza it's from, yes, Associated Press. My rule of thumb in reading newspapers is if an article source is the Associated Press, I'll just skip it and go on to something else.

Hmmm. Will the next big headline 10 years from now read "Breast cancer surging to new highs"? My wife, who is a long way from 50, is keeping her mammogram appointment in January and will continue her self-exams. We don't care what the Associated Press says!

A good reporter from The Chronicle might consider doing interviews and stories with some local physicians and their comments about this new study. Now that might prove to be interesting reading.

Robbie McMillan, Waynesboro

Comments (10) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
wizzardx1
0
Points
wizzardx1 11/30/09 - 03:54 am
0
0
Could this be an example of

Could this be an example of how muslims treat women?

overburdened_taxpayer
117
Points
overburdened_taxpayer 11/30/09 - 06:58 am
0
0
This is just the beginning of

This is just the beginning of government run Obamacare. Thin out the herd so they aren't taking up valuable time and money longer than necessary. Could this be the beginning of the rules for the responsibilities of the "death panels"?

Little Lamb
46891
Points
Little Lamb 11/30/09 - 09:03 am
0
0
Come on, Robbie. Take a

Come on, Robbie. Take a chill pill. It's just a guideline. A woman can get a mammogram a month if she wants it and is willing to pay. The guidelines made sense to me because not everyone has the same risk factors, and the false positives lead to more invasive procedures that contain their own set of risks. Use your noggin and set up the screening regime that works for you. Don't just blindly follow a one-size-fits-all program.

overburdened_taxpayer
117
Points
overburdened_taxpayer 11/30/09 - 09:04 am
0
0
It will be a

It will be a one-size-fits-all program under Obamacare.

soldout
1280
Points
soldout 11/30/09 - 09:15 am
0
0
If really concerned; women

If really concerned; women can use thermography which is more accurate and can detect up to ten years earlier.

bdittle
78
Points
bdittle 11/30/09 - 09:34 am
0
0
Here is the thing Mr.

Here is the thing Mr. McMillan, the report of the new guidelines is based on scientific studies. Your belief is based on tradition. In fact, the new guidelines are much like the ones followed in Europe so there is plenty of data about what happens 10 or 20 years down the line. I'm not saying that your wife should not get her checkup and there won't be some cases that would have been caught by an earlier mammogram, but your belief that breast cancer rates will rise is wrong.

Yosemitesam
0
Points
Yosemitesam 11/30/09 - 02:59 pm
0
0
Only a bean counter could

Only a bean counter could have come up with the new guide lines. Commenters here have said this is only a recommendation and that women could still seek testing based upon their own situation, HOWEVER, the 800 pound gorilla sitting in the corner taking notes is the nation's HEALTH CARE INSURERS! Who will use the guide lines to limit their participation in the costs of tests. They have not missed one opportunity to slowly pass along even the most routine costs of health care to patients. Higher deductibles, Higher Yearly out of pockets minimuns, higher copays for doctor visits and medicine all the while increasing monthly premiums. You can be sure they will pass this one along as well. I wonder how many of these task member panelists receive board pay or advisory stippends from insurance companies and drug companies.

ramble
0
Points
ramble 11/30/09 - 03:01 pm
0
0
Agree with bdittle. Our

Agree with bdittle. Our guidelines should be based on scientific studies, not traditional beliefs.
Also, "we don't care what the AP says" ?? Why take issue with the article in the newspaper or the AP for that matter. They were just reporting the newly released guidelines by the US Preventative Task Force. The AP or the Augusta Chronicle didn't invent the guidelines, only reported them, as they should do. Chill out.

ron_rlw
1
Points
ron_rlw 11/30/09 - 04:12 pm
0
0
The truth of the matter under

The truth of the matter under Obama Care these issues will be decided by commissions and/or task forces that the general public will have very little input or control over. The so called experts will be appointed and most likely will have the same politcal views as those that appoint them.

bdittle
78
Points
bdittle 11/30/09 - 06:58 pm
0
0
Yosemitesam, actually none of

Yosemitesam, actually none of the Task Force members are paid by insurance companies. As a side note, one of the doctors is from MCG: http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfab.htm#Background

Back to Top

Search Augusta jobs