Medical community weighs in on health care reform proposals

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A tear slides out of Donna Epperly's eye as she sits in an exam room at Belle Terrace Health and Wellness Center and remembers the death of her son, Joey, last September. She also remembers the care she got then from clinic physician Angela Overstreet-Wright, and not just for her high blood pressure.

"I had a hard time dealing with that (death)," said Ms. Epperly, 57. "But she helped me through it."

Ms. Epperly is among the more than 45 million people in the U.S. without health insurance. It isn't offered through her job as a private baby sitter, and she cannot afford to purchase an individual policy on her own.

After years of debate and false starts, there is serious talk in Washington about providing coverage for the uninsured and reforming problems that cause the U.S. to spend far more on health care than any other industrialized country, but with sometimes inadequate results.

What that reform will look like depends on your perspective.

For Ms. Epperly, being able to go to the Belle Terrace clinic, which receives funding as a federally qualified health center, is a blessing. She pays a $25 co-pay per visit, which she likes.

"I pay here, but it's not like I would pay a private doctor," she said. "With no insurance, I would pay a lot."

She looked into buying health insurance a few times, but it was too high. She knows she isn't alone.

"There's so many people who need help with insurance," she said, and she is more concerned about children going without.

"Someone like me, I'm older," Ms. Epperly said. "But I see on TV so many children who can't get help, can't get care, because they don't have insurance."

If the government is going to spend more money, clinics such as Belle Terrace make sense to her.

"Putting money into clinics like this, that's a good thing," she said. "These clinics like this are great."

When she first started coming to the clinic, "my blood pressure was really bad," Ms. Epperly said. "But today it was great. It was right on it."

More than that, Dr. Overstreet-Wright takes the time to talk to her, she said.

"It makes you feel better when you've got a doctor who will sit and talk to you and listen to you," Ms. Epperly said.

For Melinda Rider, the CEO of the Neighborhood Improvement Project, which runs the Belle Terrace clinics, that is the concept of a "medical home" where the patient can be followed and the care managed. For her, reform is about good outcomes. Her clinics have to be able to show that to one of the federal agencies that funds it, the Health Resources and Services Administration.

"We have to demonstrate that our patients get better," Ms. Rider said. That might not be a bad idea for everyone, she said. Under Medicare, that is called "pay for performance," tying reimbursement to quality outcomes.

"All payers are starting to look at that more and more," Ms. Rider said.

It ensures the patient actually gets better and that care can make a difference.

"They're going to have a better life," she said. "They're going to live longer, they're going to feel better, take care of their families and go to work."

It would also be cheaper to keep those diseases in check.

"We spend an awful lot of money on health care but very little of it on preventive care," Ms. Rider said. "Most of our resources are devoted to high-end sick care."

Three chronic diseases that seem to be causing the most damage -- obesity, hypertension and diabetes -- could also show the greatest benefit from regular care.

"I think the emphasis on primary health care is really important, and the emphasis on prevention," she said. "We have an epidemic of hypertension and diabetes that show no signs of slowing down. If we don't deal with those upstream problems, the downstream is always going to be swamped."

But putting more emphasis on prevention means having the providers do it.

"We can't push everybody into primary health care if there is no facility there to do it," Ms. Rider said.

That cooperation is a key point to Dr. Terrence Cook, an Augusta allergist who is chairman of the Project Access Committee of the Richmond County Medical Society, which coordinates voluntary physician services for the uninsured.

Project Access does pretty well in getting uninsured people into primary care offices, and patients benefit from prescription assistance programs from the manufacturers, Dr. Cook said.

Where the system runs into trouble is when a patient needs more specialized care, especially complex surgeries, that would cost a lot of money to provide. In that instance, having access to some kind of insurance would help those patients, Dr. Cook said.

"If they had a basic plan that would cover certain serious illnesses and surgical conditions, that could be very helpful," he said.

But he's also worried about the "public option," a government-created insurance plan President Obama wants to see in the mix of plans offered to the uninsured through a centralized insurance exchange as a way of putting pressure on private insurers to keep rates down and provide better coverage.

If the public plan operates like Medicare, which demands the lowest rates a provider offers, it could affect what private insurers decide to do, Dr. Cook said. And that could affect those who already have insurance.

"Whatever the plan is, and depending upon how punitive the plan is, regular health insurance tends to line up and say, 'Me too. I want the same deal,' " Dr Cook said. "If it's not going to pay for this and it's not going to pay for that, well, they'll get on the bandwagon pretty soon and copy that. Whatever those restrictions are, pretty soon it will creep into the private-sector insurance."

He wonders what good those plans would do for the patients.

"It's not a great help to you if they're not going to pay for things you need," Dr. Cook said.

If the plans are that bad, physicians won't take them, which defeats the purpose, he said.

"If it's not a plan that the majority of practicing physicians will accept, then you've not solved the problem," he said.

A lack of providers is also a concern about health reform shared by Don Snell, the CEO of MCG Health Inc., which runs Medical College of Georgia Hospital. That concern came after a briefing some Georgia hospitals received earlier this year from the Massachusetts Hospital Association.

Massachusetts moved toward universal health care coverage by requiring adults to have some form of health insurance, with some subsidies, and requiring employers of 11 or more to provide coverage or pay a tax to opt out. Individuals could access plans through the state Health Insurance Connector. The Obama administration is pushing a similar model for the nation.

All has not gone smoothly in Massachusetts.

"The enrollment was much greater than they had anticipated," Mr. Snell said. "The program is larger than anybody had anticipated. That has caused them now to go back and say, 'Wow, how do we pay for the size of this thing and the scope?' "

That was echoed in recent weeks when a component of one of the Senate health care bills was priced by the Congressional Budget Office at about $1 trillion over 10 years. Mr. Obama insisted Wednesday that those figures are off and that the reform can be funded through redirecting subsidies already in the system and eliminating some charitable deductions for those making $250,000 or more.

Even if there is insurance, it doesn't ensure access, Mr. Snell said.

"What's being talked about is universal access in terms of insurance. But that doesn't ensure that there will be a provider network," he said. "Massachusetts is having trouble treating these patients because while they now have insurance or some sort of a financial vehicle, the rates are such where a lot of providers are not signing up for it."

Mr. Obama acknowledged this problem Wednesday. A similar problem happened with Georgia Medicaid managed care, with little more than "safety net" providers signing up for it, Mr. Snell said.

"And to this day there's not much more than the safety net providers," he said. "And that's one of the lessons I think that needs to be learned and incorporated."

Though there is talk of making significant changes, hospitals have seen this before and all that ends up getting reworked is how they are paid, Mr. Snell said.

"I think the hospital industry's fear is that maybe that's all that emerges," he said.

Paul Fischer, who helped found the Center for Primary Care clinics that now dot the Augusta area, is not optimistic either. Dr. Fischer, who is also a member of the Institute of Medicine, points out that the U.S. spends much more than other nations, including Germany and Japan, but still doesn't cover about 20 percent of the people.

"It's not that we're not spending enough money; we're spending enough money," he said. "We're just not getting enough value for the money that we spend."

He points to three main areas for reform: eliminating incentives for unnecessary care, reforming the way insurance companies operate and reforming malpractice laws, which he says account for about 20 percent of health care spending when defensive medicine is included.

"I think all Americans would agree they don't think they are getting their money's worth if they're spending 20 cents on the health care dollar to be able to sue their doctor," Dr. Fischer said.

The payment incentives encourage unnecessary and unneeded care, he said.

"There are things being done in health care that are being driven by profits and not medical need," Dr. Fischer said. "And the other part of that is that as a society we are producing way too many specialists and too few primary care physicians."

Primary care physicians tend to lower costs and specialists increase them, he said, but all of the incentives in the system steer medical students toward the specialties.

"If Washington ends up with legislation that does nothing for that difference, then they'll just make the problem worse," Dr. Fischer said.

Evidence that many areas won't be addressed can already be seen in the number of organizations that have joined hands with the White House, he said.

"To be quite honest with you, I don't expect health care reform this go-around," he said." If you look at what's happening now, everybody is cutting a deal with the White House. They're getting their little piece secured."

Pharmacist Stewart Flanagin , the owner of Hill Drug Co., had a similar view of the pharmaceutical companies lining up with Mr. Obama last week. The companies announced they will provide $80 billion more to cover 50 percent of the cost of brand-name drugs for Medicare Part D patients when they run into a coverage gap. Mr. Obama touted that money as a move toward a potential funding source for health care reform. Mr. Flanagin isn't so sure.

He and other retail pharmacies have been suing the drug companies for nearly two decades to stop their practice of giving discounts to mail-order pharmacies that they won't offer to retail. Yet more prescriptions are filled by retail pharmacists than by mail, Mr. Flanagin said.

"People buying drugs at retail are paying the highest price anyway because they're not getting the discounts that they're giving mail-order and everything else," he said. "There's just inequity across the board."

Fairness is what reform would mean to him.

"We're trying to make it a level playing field at the retail level vs. all of the other levels because that's the only way we can compete," Mr. Flanagin said. "If they would sell the drugs to everybody at the same price, there wouldn't be an issue, but they're not."

The uninsured are paying the highest prices of all, he said. He would like to see a situation where a customer gets the same price for a drug, regardless of where they pick it up.

Reach Tom Corwin at (706) 823-3213 or tom.corwin@augustachronicle.com.


Q&A

Q: How big a part of the economy is health care?

A: About one-sixth of the economy -- more than any other industry.

Spending on health care totals about $2.5 trillion, 17.5 percent of our gross domestic product -- a measure of the value of all goods and services produced in the U.S. That's up from 13.8 percent in 2000 and 5.2 percent in 1960, when health spending totaled just $27.5 billion -- barely 1 percent of today's level, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health policy group.

Q: Why does President Obama say the health care system must be fixed first to repair the economy? Is it true?

A: It's absolutely correct, for a host of reasons, experts say.

"Health care is the economy," and fixing it would free money for other priorities, such as education and industrial innovation, said Meredith Rosenthal, a Harvard University professor of health economics and policy.

The health care system is dysfunctional and full of waste -- as much as 30 percent of all spending, she said. Unlike most other markets, consumers rarely know which doctors, drugs or treatments are best for them, don't price shop and, if they're insured, don't know the full cost of care. That all can lead to unnecessary spending.

Kaiser's president, Drew Altman, said health care costs have become pocketbook issues for businesses and both insured and uninsured Americans. Kaiser's polls on what consumers worry about find the cost of health care and insurance are equal with job security, gas prices and being able to pay the mortgage.

"People make the link, not just the president," he said. They're most concerned with how reform will affect them personally, he said.

Q: How do health care costs drag on the economy?

A: Growth in overall health care costs, including spending on the huge Medicare and Medicaid programs, is out of control, said Robert Laszewski, the president of consultants Health Policy and Strategy Associates. That limits how much money the government and businesses have to invest in solving the energy problem, developing products that can be sold to other countries, creating technology that can bring medical breakthroughs, building infrastructure and more.

Q: How do rising health costs affect workers and businesses?

A: Insurance premiums have skyrocketed, making it ever-tougher for workers and employers to afford them. From 1999 through 2008, annual premiums jumped 119 percent, according to Kaiser data. The average family premium paid by workers rose from $1,543 to $3,354 a year, and employer payments per worker jumped from $4,247 to $9,325.

During that span, worker earnings rose only 34 percent and overall inflation was just 29 percent. So worker income has barely kept pace with inflation, more of the paycheck is going to health costs, and there's less left over for things such as vacations, dining out, home improvements or a new car -- especially for low-wage workers and retirees. That represents a huge drag on the economic growth, considering that consumer spending powers about 70 percent of the economy.

For employers, particularly small businesses, rising insurance premiums mean there's far less money for new equipment, better facilities, research or expansion. That means fewer jobs, smaller raises and higher health premiums for workers, further limiting consumer spending.

Q: What's the impact of 50 million Americans having no insurance?

A: Ira S. Loss, the senior health care analyst at Washington Analysis, puts it this way: "We're paying to take care of those people."

Hospitals, particularly in inner-city and rural areas, charge patients with insurance more to help make up for those who can't pay their bills. And we're all paying more in taxes to cover extra payments by federal and state governments to hospitals that have more uninsured patients.

Q: Isn't health care one of the few parts of the economy that's growing?

A: Yes. Employment in the huge health care sector has grown by about 427,000 jobs -- nearly 3 percent -- since the recession began in December 2007, and it totaled 15.5 million jobs in April, the latest month with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics figures were available.

Most of the increases came in ambulatory care services (up 254,400 jobs) and hospitals (up 148,400 jobs). That was partly offset by job declines at pharmaceutical companies, drug wholesalers and pharmacies.

However, only 42,900 jobs have been added since January. That's because the steady growth in jobs in ambulatory care, hospitals and, to a lesser extent, health insurers, has slowed dramatically over those months, with hospitals adding only 7,700 jobs and insurers just 1,000.

-- Associated Press

Health center seeks to reduce strain on ER

In an effort to keep patients who need primary care from using the more expensive emergency room, the Neighborhood Improvement Project is opening the Belle Terrace Downtown Health Center.


The clinic was made possible through a $134,000 grant from the Georgia Department of Community Health, one of three pilot projects being funded around the state, said Melinda Rider, the CEO of the Neighborhood Improvement Project. The clinic will be housed in Professional Office Building II, 818 St. Sebastian Way, next to University Hospital.


The clinic, which will be open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., will have a grand opening in a few weeks, Ms. Rider said. It should allow the group to double the 7,000 patient visits it is providing through its clinic in south Augusta, Belle Terrace Health and Wellness Center, she said.


More importantly, it will help patients get better care in a more appropriate setting, she said.


"It frees up resources," Ms. Rider said. "Emergency rooms ought to be taking care of emergencies, and this will free up those resources to do that. And we can take care of those non-emergencies at a much lower cost."


If it is a success, the clinic could provide an example for others to follow, she said.


"If we can make an impact on that, that will be a tremendous help, really nationwide," Ms. Rider said. "I think they are looking for models. If we can develop that model, that's a tremendous cost savings."


-- Tom Corwin, staff writer

Vital statistics

18% - Georgians not insured

92% - The increase in average family health care premiums for South Carolinians since 2000

Source: healthreform.gov

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patriciathomas
42
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patriciathomas 06/28/09 - 06:11 am
0
0
Government insured health

Government insured health care, socialized medicine, universal health care or what ever name you hang on it, it's taxpayer funded health care for those unwilling or unable to provide for themselves or their offspring. "All for one and one for all" under government management. If all receiving government assistance were to have to give up their right to vote until they were able to support themselves, this bit of socialism would never get voted on, let alone be mandated by law. From the hard left perspective of Tom Corwin, this is the only answer. Personal responsibility never enters into the equation. If you want to save this country, get to the poles next year and remove as much "help" as you can from this mad Marxist , then return in 2012 and remove this deluded, naive fool from office. This "politically correct" experiment is on the verge of destroying this country.

Riverman1
84890
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Riverman1 06/28/09 - 07:16 am
0
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These primary care clinics

These primary care clinics are the key. They deliver a degree of care, yet those who can afford insurance will not want to use them. They provide better primary care for far less money than emergency rooms.

tfoti
0
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tfoti 06/28/09 - 07:32 am
0
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The large number that is

The large number that is stated for the 'UNINSURED" is a false number. The majority of the individuals are eligible for Medicaid but since that have not have a need for health care services they have not registered. The Democrats have known this fact for years but they chose to ignore it since it doesnt serve their agenda

patriciathomas
42
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patriciathomas 06/28/09 - 07:45 am
0
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You've got a good point

You've got a good point Riverman. These clinics should be next to the e-room so the triage people can sent the visitors to the right place.

soldout
1280
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soldout 06/28/09 - 07:45 am
0
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If you are concerned about

If you are concerned about health care the solution is already out there through alternative care like NAET, EFT etc. Cheap, non-invasive, years ahead of what is offered today and fun. Eighty percent of all offered by the medical community would no longer be needed. Water, sunshine (without sunscreen), exercise, very little TV and sugar would probably cut the need by 50% with no type care. We created this problem ourselves and we can fix it ourselves with the answers God has provided.

andywarhol
0
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andywarhol 06/28/09 - 08:08 am
0
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I know this doesn't apply to

I know this doesn't apply to all, but go to the mall today. Look at all the high dollar clothes people are wearing, and the accessories; expensive shoes, sunglasses, phones, jewelry. Then look at their cars with expensive wheels and sound systems. Lets not forget the high tech cell phones. Oh, and at home I bet a lot have PS3s and HDTVs with cable. Most of us could afford our own medical insurance if we wanted to. Even those that THINK they're poor.

andywarhol
0
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andywarhol 06/28/09 - 08:10 am
0
0
There are plans as low as

There are plans as low as $40-$50/ month. Most people pay more than that on their cell phones.

JohnQPublic
5
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JohnQPublic 06/28/09 - 08:31 am
0
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The uninsured are not the

The uninsured are not the only ones who have it tough. The insured have ever rising out of pocket limits, higher and higher copays and prescriptions costs are sometimes unaffordable. I sympathize but my pocketbook it getting squeezed too. My biggest pet peeve are folks using the "emergency room" for none emergencies.

fd1962
26
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fd1962 06/28/09 - 08:34 am
0
0
Country on the 'verge of
Unpublished

Country on the 'verge of destruction.' I can't decide which pariah to follow: Green Beret Chicken Little PT, desperate to return us to the security of the discredited compassionate conservatism which brought us headstart, big-pharma capitulation, near-social security privatization, stock market meltdown, and tailspin finish, OR Feelgood Name-Changing Alternative Medicine NAET / EFT Fun Guru Purvis Investments, thank you, who'd return us to the joys of the Inquisition in a heartbeat with just a hallelujah or two and a slight personal tithe increase. Vote your preference, while you still can, before you are marched into the fema camp of your choice. Glory.

carcraft
26234
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carcraft 06/28/09 - 09:21 am
0
0
I am not a fan of Snell by

I am not a fan of Snell by any means but he makes very good points and does know health care!! The Massachusetts plan running into finnancial problems early on and Hawaii's plan for universal child insurance ran into the same problems and went bankrupt in 7 months. People simply opted out of the private sector plans for the cheaper government plans and utitilzed health care more at cheaper rates running up costs. I think health care clinics are great and should be used more. One of the hold overs from health insurance being devised to fund hospitals and NOT CARE FOR PEOPLE is the fact that ER visits are cheaper to the consumer than clinic visits. Expensive treatments like Coronary artery Bypoass grafts (CABGS) get better funding than preventative medicine. Tort reform would also reduce costs. I could see a health treatment compensation insurance program like Workmans compensation insurace. Premiums would be paid by the patient hospital and Dr. A patient would forgo his right to sue if something occured he would have compensation from the insurance company. Don't expect this from Obama and the democrats though because they are fimly in the pocket of trial lawyers.

LibertarianexGOP
0
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LibertarianexGOP 06/28/09 - 09:55 am
0
0
"Ms. Epperly is among the

"Ms. Epperly is among the more than 45 million people in the U.S. without health insurance. .... For Ms. Epperly, being able to go to the Belle Terrace clinic,.... She pays a $25 co-pay per visit"

Is sounds like Ms Epperly is getting the care she needs. I don't see a convincing argument that this isn't working. No insurance does not equal no care.

My niece recently needed surgery costing $7000. She and her husband have no health insurance. The hospital agreed to do the procedure for $5000, they used their $2500 tax refund for half and a church group paid the other $2500. She got the procedure and is well now.

Some in my family use this as example of why we need government insurance. I see it as the opposite. They needed care, they got it.

patriciathomas
42
Points
patriciathomas 06/28/09 - 10:13 am
0
0
extremely uninformed and

extremely uninformed and prejudiced fd1962. It's not a case of "either/or". Your CNN interpretation of conservatism doesn't jive with reality. The previous offers from the government weren't a bit better than the socialized mess the messiah is trying to strangle us with now. They, too, had WAY too much socialism integrated because of the driven "need" for redistribution. So far, this b.s. is still all about vote buying. It seems as though your price has been met.

getreal2012
0
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getreal2012 06/28/09 - 11:25 am
0
0
Why should I have to pay for

Why should I have to pay for someone else's healthcare? The number of "uninsured" is also false as someone said. Dont' forget about the 10 to 20 million ILLEGAL ALIENS that get lumped into this number. Send them back to Mexico and solve half the problem.

Second, want to see govt run healthcare? Talk to a veteran about the VA and see how they like the care they get. [filtered word] poor... govt run healthcare.

Who is going to be able to pay for anything after the Dems and Obama triple or more our energy costs because of their false claims of "global warming".. which has been proved to be a hoax to creat more taxes.

It is time to take our country back.

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 06/28/09 - 12:41 pm
0
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The upwardly spiraling costs

The upwardly spiraling costs of our current disease-/illness-/injury-treatment approach to the problem of national wellness are, on the one hand, functions of a prodigal demand for medical services pulled by patient ignorance and lack of self-discipline and, on the other hand, functions of exploding costs pushed by greedy real estate and construction interests as well as by selfish public and private "health care" bureaucrats and functionaries. Whose approaches to the reform of our approach to national wellness address these demand-pull and cost-push factors?

patriciathomas
42
Points
patriciathomas 06/28/09 - 01:22 pm
0
0
As long as the government,

As long as the government, which has no cost restrictions, continues to "help " with medical care, it will continue to be an unaffordable mess for those whose income doesn't exceed $35k and an expensive investment for those with less than $80k. To make the health care costs come back into range, they should be allowed to compete on the free market, just like other goods and services.

jack
10
Points
jack 06/28/09 - 01:43 pm
0
0
We who pay taxes and have

We who pay taxes and have health insurance are already paying for those who either can't or won't get their own health care insurance. As one writer put it, obesity, hypertension and renal failure are major deseases in this country that could be prevent3d in many cases by self discipline (no more fies, Big Macs, non-diet drinks, etc). Like some cmpanies and government agencies, those who smoke pay more for health insurance. Make that across the board on the public with medicare, meicaid recipenents. I also like the idea of not allowing those on welfare the vote and those receiving such welfare taking drug tests to continue on welfare for a DEFINITE period of time. Call/write/emaio your congressmaen and tell them NO to socialized/BimbObama health care/redistribution of wealth. The same for Cap and tax now before the Senate. 2010, vote OUT hose who voted FOR cap and tax as well as socialized medicine. 2012. vote OUT the clueless, socialist idiot in the WH and his unaccountable czars..

carcraft
26234
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carcraft 06/28/09 - 02:02 pm
0
0
The Massachusetts plan is now

The Massachusetts plan is now finnancial insoluble and has by cut 100 million dollars and Hawaii's plan for universal child insurance went bankrupt in 7 months. How does Obama plan to finnance it, being a hypocrite he will tax the health insurance of others like he ridiculed McCain for purposing!

charlesd
0
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charlesd 06/28/09 - 03:43 pm
0
0
628.00 MONTHLY is far to much

628.00 MONTHLY is far to much for any single male at the age of 55 yo with a FIVE THOUSAND DOLLAR DEDUCTIBLE with no present or past health problems to pay for health insurance. There are no 40 to 50 dollar plans out there. Those that think like that don't even know whats available and have been on the roll of some companies group plan or some government employee plan WAKE UP.something has to be done. This is a house payment for many ! This is my plan...........

LCC0256
634
Points
LCC0256 06/28/09 - 04:07 pm
0
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The bottom line is this. if

The bottom line is this. if you have children then SUPPORT them. (Including purchasing health insurance for them.) What kind of person continually looks to the givernment time and time and time again for "free" cradle to grave entitlements?..."I am here GIVE ME (fill in the blank) because i "deserve" i'm "entitled" to it and "YOU need to pay for it"..These are sick, sad, pathetic, WEAK MINDED SPINELESS excuses for human beings....What is really enraging is that these democrat socialist are so ignorant...so totally ignorant of factual history of ANY SORT that they dont even know WHAT SOCIALISM is & what a FAILURE it has been throughout history...robbing individual freedoms and liberty thus enslaving their populations..Take back the public educational system in this country - teach children the truth without the socialist/marxist propaganda of the last 50 years & let the then unbiased educated student grow into productive citizens who will make decisions that will never allow all these socialist policies to see the light of day.. BY THE WAY these pathetic (albeit dangerous) American democratic/socialist come in all COLORS not just white or black....

carcraft
26234
Points
carcraft 06/28/09 - 04:10 pm
0
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charlesd on Sun Jun 28, 2009

charlesd on Sun Jun 28, 2009 3:43 PM HOw do we pay for health insurance for everybody? Hawaii Broke, Massachusetts broke, why will it be differant for nataional health care. Every body gets some care now, about 10% cannot afford it, we are going to screw up 90% of the peoples health care so the government can run the health care system and 10% will get about what they have now?

charlesd
0
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charlesd 06/28/09 - 04:18 pm
0
0
How do you propose that I pay

How do you propose that I pay for my health insurance. Over 7,500.00 yearly and continuing to rise yearly ?

LCC0256
634
Points
LCC0256 06/28/09 - 04:20 pm
0
0
want to see this trend

want to see this trend continue until the US Constitution is nothing but a meaningless piece of paper? ( it is very close now) Then keep sending your children to the public schools..Think now...THINK...how do you imagine these ideas got a foothold in the first place? How much of this communist dribble has been preached beginning 50 or so years ago from the ivy halls of academia (where the current "teachers" were educated) Is it any wonder that this socialist dogma is accepted as fact by the poor children that have been exposed to this "public education" fiasco now in place..to paraphrase one of their heroes (Gandhi) tell a lie loud enough and long enough and it becomes the truth...Control of your life is what these people are after...they have achieved much of it already..one excellent and effective way to counter their domination in your life is to send your children to a school where they will read books that have not been revised with propaganda & in an environment where they will be FREE to think and learn without control from the government...

soldout
1280
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soldout 06/28/09 - 04:22 pm
0
0
Trust the great physican; no

Trust the great physican; no one cares for you like him

perymason
0
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perymason 06/28/09 - 04:25 pm
0
0
Uh, she doen't have

Uh, she doen't have insurance, but gets medical treatment for 25 bucks a pop---which my insurance co-pay was that cheap.

perymason
0
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perymason 06/28/09 - 04:27 pm
0
0
If you are old and infirm,

If you are old and infirm, under obamoron"s health restructuring, you will be sent to a FEMA Camp and turned into soylent green to feed all the welfare loafers!

perymason
0
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perymason 06/28/09 - 05:22 pm
0
0
Charles, unfortunately, you

Charles, unfortunately, you make too much for the govt to help you, BUT YOU WILL BE PAYING OUT THE AZZ FOR THE ONES WHO SIT ON THEIRS!

perymason
0
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perymason 06/28/09 - 05:25 pm
0
0
People need to get a grip and

People need to get a grip and quit listening to obamoron. If you work, this plan will not help you, it only is supposed to help the ones on the govt dole who get free care anyway! Does anyone else smell a rat in that pile of poop?

disssman
6
Points
disssman 06/28/09 - 07:04 pm
0
0
The cost atated by Andywarhol

The cost atated by Andywarhol is correct. What he didn't tell you was how to get reimbursed from these cheap insurance companies. Heck if we are all so gullible, I might start selling specialized auto insurance. Of course I will need a 100 page set of mice print exceptions, but I'll sell policies for a dollar a day to anyone needing one.

charlesd
0
Points
charlesd 06/28/09 - 07:25 pm
0
0
Suppose I just quit paying,

Suppose I just quit paying, Then WHAT HAPPENS ?

carcraft
26234
Points
carcraft 06/28/09 - 07:44 pm
0
0
Charlessd, how old are you,

Charlessd, how old are you, are you married? I found health insurance policies for $4,000 per year with $5,000 decutable $30.00 per visit first three visits. Do you smoke? quite. Are you married, cheaper if not. I know you are frustrated but there are ways out of this with out bankrupting America, or having me pay for my own health insurance and yours..

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