Superb doctor leaves lasting memories

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In 1952, Dr. Paul Weston became the first black surgeon to have admitting privileges at University Hospital. That was also the year that my mother had her first child at University Hospital in Augusta. She would not know that their paths would cross many years later.

Fast-forward to 1973, when my mother and sister were returning home from a wedding shower in Augusta. As she crossed the intersection of Gordon Highway and Walton Way, Mother never saw the semi-tractor-trailer truck that broadsided her car, sending it into a tailspin, and nearly bending it in half.

Kind people rushed to the scene to help as my mother and my sister awaited the ambulance that took them to University's emergency room. My dad was called, and he and I immediately headed for the hospital. I'll never forget that emergency room sight: my mother and my sister, side by side on stretchers, with doctors and nurses all around. I could see that Mom had a head injury, as she was bleeding profusely. My sister had been in the passenger seat, and no seat belts were worn by either. Mom was thrown into the windshield, suffering head lacerations, while my sister sustained some mild kidney damage.

As Dad and I looked on in shock, a doctor walked over to tell him that the blow to Mom's head had severed an artery that required immediate surgery. What he said next surprised us. I'll never forget it. He said, "The surgeon on call is a black doctor. Do you have any objection to him doing this procedure?"

Thank God my father was not a prejudiced man. He told the doctor that, of course, there was nothing wrong with the surgeon's being black, and to go ahead with the surgery. The surgeon on call that day was Dr. Paul Weston.

I remember Dr. Weston's calm manner as he came into the room and quietly took over. We left the room, and Dr. Weston proceeded with surgery to repair Mom's artery, thus saving her life.

I shudder to think what might have happened if Dad had objected to Dr. Weston because of his color. What a sad world when a person's color could be a deciding factor in the saving of a life!

Dr. Weston left a great footprint on the CSRA with his many decades of service, and he will be sorely missed. But I, for one, will never forget how he touched the lives of four obscure people from the little town of New Ellenton, S.C.

Rhonda F. Jones

Evans

(Editor's note: Dr. Weston died May 6.)

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GGpap
491
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GGpap 06/05/09 - 01:58 am
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A beautiful testimony for a

A beautiful testimony for a man that was trusted without reservation because of his color. Very nice letter, Ms. Jones. GGpap

patriciathomas
42
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patriciathomas 06/05/09 - 06:12 am
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While I'm sure Dr Weston was

While I'm sure Dr Weston was a fine physician, this is a very racist and whinny letter. I'm not wearing a seat belt while typing and I don't mind if a doctor has skin pigment.

justus4
99
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justus4 06/05/09 - 06:50 am
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A positive story...if U
Unpublished

A positive story...if U believe in bunny rabbits and the tooth fairy. There were over 21 lynching from 1940-55 in that area of the south alone, not counting the false imprisoments, possibly rapes & murders, etc, which can't be erased because a so-called good white person ALLOWED his family to be assisted by a Black doctor. What kind of warped mind fails to recognize that an injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. Of course the Black doctor was a true testament to the human spirit, and a paragon of lived virtues, but it didn't take a day in 1973 for his life's work to be known. He was a superb individual long before that by overcoming a racist state government, separate-but-equal educational system and a wicked, corrupted judicial system. Yep, ol' Doc done good, but what happened to the other 98% of men who looked like him during that time? History has the horrible answers.

blues550
355
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blues550 06/05/09 - 07:56 am
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Dr Weston walked in the
Unpublished

Dr Weston walked in the shadows of another black doctor from Augusta - Dr. George Stoney, who did the majority of Walter Reed's work in beating malarie.

Bizkit
29206
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Bizkit 06/05/09 - 09:32 am
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You know there are other

You know there are other minority physicians too like american indian, indian, asian, arab, etc. Why would you care if they were purple with pink polka dots if they were a good physician. Also would it matter if they were female rather than male.

confederate american
0
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confederate american 06/05/09 - 09:49 am
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justus4 that hate you carry

justus4 that hate you carry around every day is going to eat your poor soul.do you think the black race where the only people that where ever beat or hung.you need to read history more there where far more white people hung through time than blacks.get a da-n life.

RebelTA
1
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RebelTA 06/05/09 - 10:25 am
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JUST is a prime example why

JUST is a prime example why some people should be drowned at birth!

jack
10
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jack 06/05/09 - 12:25 pm
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Bizkit, my cardiologist is a

Bizkit, my cardiologist is a feale and not only good looking, but very good at what she does. I owe it to her for saving my life. My favorite PA is also female and extremely good.-should finsih and become an M.D. As for skin color, I doubt anyone would object if a purple person (male or female) were busy savng their life. My senior medic in Vietnam was black and the best I knew or have known. No one paid attention to his skin color when treating the wounded. As fur Justass4, I'm tired of his racist blatherings.

Niko Mahs
83
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Niko Mahs 06/05/09 - 12:55 pm
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I'll bet old PT would not let

I'll bet old PT would not let Dr. Weston operate on him. And if not then PT would get what he deserved. Death & the down elevator!

The Knave
24
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The Knave 06/05/09 - 01:17 pm
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Well, here come patricathomas

Well, here come patricathomas and jack with their contribution to the word's already ample supply of inanity, drivel and stupidity. There is nothing "racist" or "whinny" about the testimonial letter. It is heartfelt and warmly praising of a person who seems to deserve such praise, upon the occasion of his death. patricathomas is exhibiting her/his/its usual proclivity for indecipherable and spacey rants (e.g., I'm not wearing a seat belt while typing.") They have no sense of historical perspective, or choose to ignore history. In 1973, when the subject accident occurred, Augusta was a very racist place. There were lots of bigots around that would sooner have their wives die than be touched by a black physician. Thankfully, there are less bigots today, I think, but the population of the ignorant and mentally infirm seems to be growing. Perhaps if patricathomas did wear a seat belt while typing, her/his/its obvious mental defects could have been avoided, assuming such defects were caused by falling out of her/his/its chair onto her/his/its head while typing. And, jack, you have really enlightened us with "my cardiologist is a feale...and...good looking." Brilliant!

Fiat_Lux
14847
Points
Fiat_Lux 06/05/09 - 02:40 pm
0
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I think it's sad that people

I think it's sad that people harp and carp about a tribute to a good man. If you're that bored, get off your duff and instead of just sucking the goodness out of your airspace, go contribute something to the other people's lives.

corgimom
27929
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corgimom 06/05/09 - 04:25 pm
0
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It was still alive and well

It was still alive and well in 1984, I was asked the same question before I began going to my ob/gyn. People recoiled in shock and horror when I told them who my doctor was.

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