Biker rides to shed light on homelessness

  • Follow Metro

Bordering a gingerbread house with icing, gummy bears and gum drops was the best time Valencia Logan has had with her children in months.

The Augusta mother and her three children have lived at the Salvation Army's homeless shelter since March. On Thursday evening, Ms. Logan said she was able to forget about her situation and bask in her children's joy over smearing icing all over her clothes.

"This is a great activity. They could go outside or just sit under me, but this is something where I really get to be interactive with them," she said at the shelter Thursday. "This is probably something you would only get to do once or twice in your lifetime."

Trish Karter, the owner of a Boston baking company, Dancing Deer, gave about five mothers the opportunity to enjoy some baked goods and time with their children.

The Boston woman started a bike ride Wednesday in Atlanta that will stretch 1,500 miles over 15 days.

She made a stop in Augusta to distribute her company's Sweet Home gingerbread houses -- 35 percent of the sales of the treats go toward college scholarships for homeless and low-income mothers.

She plans to visit 15 shelters by Mother's Day and spread awareness about homelessness.

"We're trying to get single mothers into permanent homes. The education can help," Ms. Karter said. "I hope I can show that private businesses need to think about more than money. Their success is also measured in what effect they have on a society."

Every year, 600,000 families with 1.35 million children experience homelessness in the United States, according to the National Alliance to End Homelessness. In January, more than 550 women and children were homeless in Augusta, according to a CSRA Economic Opportunity Authority survey.

Ingrid Tutt, assistant development director, said she hoped that Ms. Karter's efforts would change the perception of homelessness.

"She understands that the face of homelessness has changed," Ms. Tutt said. "It's not the stranger on the corner. It's mothers. It's men who do work, and just don't have a home."

Ms. Karter said she plans to expand the Sweet Home project nationally.

The project could be a benefit to many local women, Ms. Logan said.

She said she hopes she and her three children will one day attend college.

"Homelessness is a big issue, especially for mothers with their children," Ms. Logan said. "I never thought I would be in this situation, but it's nice to know someone does care and wants to help."

Reach Stephanie Toone at (706) 823-3215 or stephanie.toone@augustachronicle.com.

by the numbers

172

Women and children living in homeless shelters in Augusta

379

Women and children living on the streets in Augusta

600,000

Homeless families in the U.S.

Track Trish Karter's ride and learn about the Sweet Home project at www.dancingdeer.com/ride.

Comments (11) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
patriciathomas
44
Points
patriciathomas 04/24/09 - 02:17 am
0
0
A lot of people know and a

A lot of people know and a lot of people care and a lot of people help. It would be nice if mothers think about this situation before they start making babies. It would cut WAY down on those that need to cover their responsibilities for them.

Townie
1
Points
Townie 04/24/09 - 06:25 am
0
0
Patriciathomas, you are an

Patriciathomas, you are an arse. You can tell you have never had to deal with any real issues in your life or you would have more compassion. Thirty years ago, I was just like that woman at the shelter. I had two small babies, father left, and I found myself with my children living in an old shack with no utilities. Things like that happen. Fortunately, I recovered financially and my children and I all attended college and are now productive citizens. Heck, we may even pass you in the Kroger store in Evens! So please, reserve judgement for God. Remember the saying "But for the Grace of God go I".

patriciathomas
44
Points
patriciathomas 04/24/09 - 06:39 am
0
0
Townie, did someone ride a

Townie, did someone ride a bicycle for you 30 years ago? or did someone know, care and help? Since you claim to have recovered, my arse would venture to guess it was the latter. While you have a nice story, it actually agrees with my post. However, I would venture to guess that TODAY, the vast minority of homeless have a story similar to yours and an even smaller minority will have an outcome similar to yours. Remember the good advice, think before you post.

LadyCisback
4
Points
LadyCisback 04/24/09 - 07:05 am
0
0
and the point of this article

and the point of this article is.....

andywarhol
0
Points
andywarhol 04/24/09 - 07:06 am
0
0
What PT says is the truth.

What PT says is the truth. That was not a blanket statement that included all women. The truth hurts and the truth is it would cut way down the women in that situation if they found a career, education, and independence before having babies; both married and unmarried.

LadyCisback
4
Points
LadyCisback 04/24/09 - 07:31 am
0
0
this starts at home and a lot

this starts at home and a lot of these women don't have a good example at home when they are young, they lack common sense and lack home training and manners.. so how it be expected for them to have common sense when they lay down with the thug next door, the homie across town and the drug dealer across the street.. bad examples and lack of everything begins at home and for the most part none of this things exist..

serenity
0
Points
serenity 04/24/09 - 08:34 am
0
0
PLease know these numbers

PLease know these numbers are incorrect. The point in time was for one night ONLY and included men, women children nd those on the streets.

hurlyburly11
0
Points
hurlyburly11 04/24/09 - 10:25 am
0
0
...and it certainly will not

...and it certainly will not hurt her business or the sale of gingerbread houses from the 'dancing Deer" now will it?.......

MtnMan
1
Points
MtnMan 04/24/09 - 01:26 pm
0
0
Yes Patricia, it would be so

Yes Patricia, it would be so nice if everyone could live in a "lollipop world" where a girl would never make a mistake, and her entire life runs smoothly....oh well, that is exactly the kind of reply I would expect from you.

patriciathomas
44
Points
patriciathomas 04/24/09 - 09:58 pm
0
0
Sorry for the confusion

Sorry for the confusion mthman. I'm sure you dedicate all of your earnings to the unfortunate just to look like you're magnanimous. Why didn't I think of taking that action myself?

shenyse86
15
Points
shenyse86 04/27/09 - 10:53 am
0
0
All of you missed the bus on

All of you missed the bus on this. I'm not sure if any of you understand. The fact that these women are homeless and living in the shelter has nothing to do with "home training" it has nothing to do with the sale of gingerbread houses or furthering the financial gain of the woman running the business. It has only to do with bringing attention to the plight of those who are homeless, To inspire conversation and hopefully action. It is also intended to foster communitcation and free play between children and their parents during their stressful situation. I was there and had the opportunity to watch the process. There was not a time that Ms. Karter advertised her business...The way the article was written leads people to believe that Ms. Karter came down here to sell baked goods then visit the shelters--that was not the case.

Back to Top
loading...
Search Augusta jobs