The undeclared war

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In nearly six years of war, America has lost 4,215 U.S. servicemen.

By contrast, more than 6,000 people were killed in drug violence last year in Mexico -- much of it on the U.S. border.

There is, in short, an undeclared war going on along the American border with Mexico.

At least one American has died, and Border Patrol stations and crossings have closed temporarily, due to violent demonstrations on the Mexican side -- which some believe may in part be staged by drug traffickers seeking cover for their smuggling.

"The protesters have temporarily blocked border crossings in Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, Matamoros and Ciudad Juárez and shut down parts of Monterrey, a major industrial hub in the northeast," reported the New York Times .

Some Americans' penchant for using illegal drugs -- called a victimless crime by supporters -- is directly responsible for chaos and mass deaths on the border.

So is the Mexican government's ineptness and the American government's long-standing neglect of the problem.

It's gotten so bad that federal officials and colleges and universities are warning American students to be wary of going to Mexico for spring break.

"We're not necessarily telling students not to go, but we're going to certainly alert them," said one college administrator from Rhode Island.

Others, such as the University of Arizona at Tucson, are flatly telling students not to go to Mexico.

Another under-reported element of this story is the escalation of Mexican drug-gang violence in U.S. cities.

"This is organized crime," Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard has been quoted. "The enemy we are combating is extremely well organized, extremely disciplined and extremely well trained."

Mexico City is the world leader in kidnappings for ransom.

Phoenix, Ariz., is now second.

"The bloodshed that is happening today in Mexico is eye-opening," writes CNN producer Ismael Estrada, who grew up on the border. "There has always been violence. It's the nature of doing illegal business in Mexico -- people die. But today is much different than anything I have ever seen.

"This is definitely not the Mexico I remember."

Mexican gangs allied with Los Angeles-based gangs have an increasing and bloody presence on U.S. streets and prisons far north of Arizona. Indeed, a sheriff's deputy was attacked and shot by three illegal aliens in West Columbia, S.C., on Feb. 8 in what authorities say was an attempted police assassination for gang initiation. A search of their house also revealed evidence of burglaries.

We're gratified that the national media are finally starting to report on the new Mexican War. The worst of it has been going on since at least the start of 2007. It's a tragedy that so many people have died, and a travesty that it has made such an attractive tourist destination so dicey. That's especially sad for those Mexicans and Americans who depend for their livelihoods on U.S. travel to sunny Mexico.

Our two governments must do everything in their power to win this war with the drug traffickers -- starting with the securing of the border.

Both our peoples are depending on it.

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GGpap
528
Points
GGpap 03/02/09 - 01:57 am
0
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"Our two governments must do

"Our two governments must do everything in their power to win this war with the drug traffickers -- starting with the securing of the border." Sheeeesh! Following the body of the message, AND the heading for the article, the author's closing argument is more than insipid. Secure our borders? How, by building another chicken fence? There has to be a better solution for dealing with the problem/s discussed in the article. How about: Full U.S. military control and engagement on the border (surely constitutionally justifiable; we are being invaded by illegals and Mexican drug lord armies), significant local, state, and national police tasks forces in the major cities that are harboring the thugs that are taking over our nation, and the legalization of Marijuana at once. If it is war, then fight it as such. Chicken fences won't do the job. GGpap

justus4
130
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justus4 03/02/09 - 02:33 am
0
0
The US military cannot be
Unpublished

The US military cannot be deployed to our border unless war is declared and Congress passes a resolution for a named War. That won't happen. The major problem with Mexico's police agencies is corruption and taking money from drug lords. They must identify those corrupted officials and make examples of them. And the US Border Agents must also identify their corrupted agents and again, get rid of them. Before they can address the movement of drugs, they must ensure that all operations are examined for corrupt officers. Again, another example of corrupt governmental enforcement agencies spilling over because the rot has gotten so deep.

patriciathomas
44
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patriciathomas 03/02/09 - 04:03 am
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Without a doubt, the point I

Without a doubt, the point I disagreed with Bush on the most was his open door policy on the Mexican border. The problems were obvious before the policy. Now America must deal with this horrible legacy.

Riverman1
123696
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Riverman1 03/02/09 - 05:48 am
0
0
This again demonstrates why

This again demonstrates why legalizing, controlling and taxing drugs would save billions annually in this country, in addition to stablizing Mexico. Spend a fraction of the saved money educating the public why they shouldn't use drugs and you will almost wipe out crime in this country and do away with the Mexican drug cartels while saving thousands of lives on both sides of the border. Wars of any kind on drugs don't work. Haven't we learned this by now?

JohnRandolphHardisonCain
576
Points
JohnRandolphHardisonCain 03/02/09 - 06:29 am
0
0
Comparing the number of U.S.

Comparing the number of U.S. military fatalities from the war in Iraq to anything else - traffic deaths, deaths from cancer, homicides in Chicago, or drug related killings in Mexico - is specious & juvenile. But that is what we have come to expect from The Augusta Chronicle editorial staff (ACES). Has United States invaded Mexico, gotten 30,000+ soldiers wounded, gotten nearly a thousand "private contractors" (i.e. mercenaries) killed, or spent nearly $1 trillion in upfront (not counting longterm costs associated with the Iraq war) interdicting drugs & fighting Mexican drug traffickers here & inside Mexico? The answer is NO! What United States did was give a green light to undocumented workers from MEXICO for generations. That guaranteed a cheap food supply in this country & provided a release valve so Mexico did not explode long ago. Republicans welcomed illegal Mexican workers who undercut U.S. unions & "did jobs Americans wouldn't do". But when the economy turned down undocumented Mexicans became the villains. Mexicans remitted huge sums of money to Mexico which helped stabilize the economy. No more. I warned that a failed states on our border was a national security threat.

patriciathomas
44
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patriciathomas 03/02/09 - 07:59 am
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Cain, I've been reading your

Cain, I've been reading your posts for a while now and the one thing I certain you're an expert on is, "specious & juvenile". You might want to address that sty before commenting on someone's mote. Your creative and revisionist memory combined with your reassignment of fact is often just silly.

JohnRandolphHardisonCain
576
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JohnRandolphHardisonCain 03/02/09 - 08:08 am
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ACES doesn't even have the

ACES doesn't even have the number of U.S. service members killed in Iraq correct. According to Associated Press and Iraq Coalition Casualty Count as of 28 Feb 2009 there were 4,253 U.S. fatalities from the war in Iraq not 4,215 as stated in this Chronicle editorial. The Chronicle states that only one American has died as a result of the Mexican drug wars. By that comparison the U.S. war in Iraq has been 4253 times more deadly for Americans than Mexican drug related killings. And if Americans smoking pot fuels drug wars then what does driving SUVs do to fuel violence in the Middle East? Riverman is partly right: legalize pot, tax it AND levy a $6 per gallon tax on gasoline.

LaTwon
1
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LaTwon 03/02/09 - 09:19 am
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you are really losing it

you are really losing it cain. i cant wait til you realize that obongo is just another front man for the neo cons and the wars drag on and the good intentions of the socialist govt destroy whats left and totalitarianism rules the day. will you be happy then?

LaTwon
1
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LaTwon 03/02/09 - 09:53 am
0
0
the chinese used to joke that

the chinese used to joke that america is being invaded and they have their troops in iraq.

JohnRandolphHardisonCain
576
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JohnRandolphHardisonCain 03/02/09 - 10:04 am
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Socialists are already upset

Socialists are already upset with Obama for his American Establishment position on Iraq.
lefti.blogspot.com/2009_02_01_archive.html#5992513137251077104

I4PUTT
5
Points
I4PUTT 03/02/09 - 10:45 am
0
0
Build the fence. That's

Build the fence. That's simply the first step. Find the tunnels & destroy them. Stop all services to illegal aliens including hospital care. End any and all welfare services for these folks today. Stiff penalties for employers who hire illegals. Make it as undesirable to be here as it is to remain in Mexico.

willistontownsc
55
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willistontownsc 03/02/09 - 10:47 am
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0
Cain, like always, have an

Cain, like always, have an good point. The Iraq war is nearly 4,300 times more deadly than the drug war. I don't condone drug use. Nor would I legalize marijuana.

Signal Always
3
Points
Signal Always 03/02/09 - 10:57 am
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0
6 dollars per gallon gas tax?

6 dollars per gallon gas tax? You've lost your rabid-[filtered word]ed mind, Cain.

Niko Mahs
83
Points
Niko Mahs 03/02/09 - 11:30 am
0
0
We take the drugs, and sell

We take the drugs, and sell the Mexicans our automatic weapons. And we now have to complain. Stupid is as stupid does. Gump had something there. Keep watching those reality shows and reading your Bible and talking about others.

reader54
699
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reader54 03/02/09 - 11:52 am
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Riverman:You hit the mark !

Riverman:You hit the mark ! We can solve this problem immediately by legalizing and regulating drug use. Has anyone ever heard of an addict unable to find drugs? Remove the criminal element and the problem is solved.This is not a perfect society and I would rather choose the lesser of two evils.

southernguy08
580
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southernguy08 03/02/09 - 12:30 pm
0
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JUSTUS, unless the oath for
Unpublished

JUSTUS, unless the oath for servicemen has changed, you are sworn to protect the USA from all enemies, foreign and domestic. That means we can put our troops on the border, preferably with a completed, concrete wall, sensors to detect tunnels dug under it, and manned by armed soldiers. And CAIN, your blaming the US for all these illegals coming is pathetic! And to our SPINELESS CONGRESS AND PRESIDENT, do the right thing instead of voting "present." BUILD THE WALL AND GUARD OUR BORDERS!!! AMERICA IS UNDER ATTACK FROM FOREIGN INVADERS!!

jedex6
20
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jedex6 03/02/09 - 12:40 pm
0
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The Mexican drug war is

The Mexican drug war is looking like the war in Chicago and other big American cities during the twenties, brought on by the rightous crusade of conservative moralists against booze. This one differs only in that the prohibited substances are different intoxicating agents. Legislating morality does not work, just like abstinence education. But try telling that to a conservative. A religious belief in legislating morality, in this case, kills, tortures, creates mayhem and violence upon innocent people, and benefits nobody. Protect the border? Most of this violence is occuring in Mexico. If this country legalized drugs, the profit motive would disappear and the problem would go away overnight. Protecting the border is a separate issue. It would have a miniscule effect on the problem. Look at the illegal drugs coming in from other countries that we do not share a border with, and you can see my point.

Brad Owens
5384
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Brad Owens 03/02/09 - 12:47 pm
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RM1 and reader53 are correct!

RM1 and reader53 are correct! Never fight if there is nothing gained by winning. Since we cannot win this war is is obvious that we need to stop fighting OR change tactics so that WE control all the cards and the cartels are out of the illegal drug trade business. For what we spend fighting drugs we could buy all they produce and distribute with hefty taxes at that! Inmagine that, tax money creating money! Seriously, I support full decriminalization and maybe even legalization at some point. Either way it should be controlled like tobacco and likker. we have proved that things can be REGULATED why not regulate when you can't eradicate?

jack
12
Points
jack 03/02/09 - 12:48 pm
0
0
6 dollars per gallon gas tax?

6 dollars per gallon gas tax? You've lost your rabid-[filtered word]ed mind, Cain.
Posted by Signal Always on Mon Mar 2, 2009 9:57 AM....This has been apparent ith every blathering post he has made.

jack
12
Points
jack 03/02/09 - 12:53 pm
0
0
Brad, Holland has legalized

Brad, Holland has legalized drugs and has a very low crime rate. If you want a drug in Holland, you go to the drug store and buy it (paying the tax of course).

southernguy08
580
Points
southernguy08 03/02/09 - 12:54 pm
0
0
JEDEX, I see the drugs that
Unpublished

JEDEX, I see the drugs that come in from other countries we don't share a border with. They pale in comparison to Mexico! If you don't see these illegals, many with violent criminal pasts, as an foreign invasion of our country, then you need to take the rose colored glasses off. Of course, I'm just one of those evil right wingers you're always spouting off on. And you're right...I didn't vote for Hussein.

patriciathomas
44
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patriciathomas 03/02/09 - 12:56 pm
0
0
grouse, you've finally made a

grouse, you've finally made a simi-intelligent comment. You must be joking. Actually, it may have merits though.

johnsmith
9
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johnsmith 03/02/09 - 12:58 pm
0
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jedex, legislating morality

jedex, legislating morality doesn't work, you're right. However, education isn't legislation; abstinence education does work, & abstinence does work, 100% of the time. Attempts to legislate victimless "moral" crimes MUST escalate. People want to put bad things in their mouths, for reasons known only to God, and if you draw a line in the sand, all you get is an arms race. However, to draw a parallel between that failed policy and abstinence education is simply, well, stupid. In spite of the billions and trillions of dollars poured down the social policy rat hole in the past 75 or so years, we still have adolescents who: don't know how girls get pregnant, don't know how girls and boys get STDs, don't know what condoms will and will not "prevent," don't know how condoms are to be used, don't know that pills don't prevent infections...the list goes on. However, if you simply present a reasonable, factual account of the POTENTIAL consequences of sexual activity by people too immature to handle those consequences, guess what? Greater numbers of them choose to wait. Hell, nobody wants them to "not," we just want them to "wait." And waiting works, 100% of the time it's tried.

jedex6
20
Points
jedex6 03/02/09 - 01:21 pm
0
0
They have sex ed and birth

They have sex ed and birth control freely available in western European countries. Their teen STD, pregnagcy, and abortion rates are a tiny fraction of what ours is. Enough said? Abstinence "education" is not education. The purpose of education is to impart imformation and knowledge. Abstinence "education" promotes ignorance, guilt and shame. Ask Bristol Palin and stop listening to religious conservatives like Cal Thomas. He would not want to be kept in the dark if he were a teenage female and you can take that to the (broke, that conserrvatives won't let O fix) bank.

jedex6
20
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jedex6 03/02/09 - 01:28 pm
0
0
The reasons we still have

The reasons we still have teens who don't know how they get pregnant is because school systems are required to teach abstinence and millions of dollars that could have been spent on real sex ed was wasted on these useless programs. Numerous studies have shown that abstinence only ed, at best, delays sexual activity in teens by about two years or so, and that it makes them less likely to use birth control and more misinformed when they do become active.

southernguy08
580
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southernguy08 03/02/09 - 02:53 pm
0
0
JEDEX, when I was stationed
Unpublished

JEDEX, when I was stationed outside of Singapore, I was amazed at how much little drug traffic there was. Then I found out why. There is zero tolerance, and the DEATH PENALTY is still used. You can educate people till the cows come home. As long as the penalty is considered small and the payoff big, there will be those who will take the chance for easy money in trafficking drugs. You can rant against the right wing conservatives all you like, but holding Europe up as a shining example of any kind of success is an absolute joke. And yes, I was stationed there too.

corgimom
53568
Points
corgimom 03/02/09 - 02:59 pm
0
0
There are still way too many

There are still way too many parents out there who refuse to accept the fact that teens have sex and think it can be stopped by "abstinence education". Telling teenagers not to do something that they want to do is like pouring gasoline on a fire. Jedex, great post!

devilishlymad67
0
Points
devilishlymad67 03/02/09 - 03:53 pm
0
0
dig a big ditch (using

dig a big ditch (using welfare recepients so they can have a job) use the dirt dug up to build up the levee in New Orleans (fixing that problem). Get the extra gators out of folks yards in Florida (fixing that problem) put them in the big ditch the new employees just dug................fill with water. Take some boys from some hunting clubs...have the new employees build stands and let the hunters use the illegals for target practice. Problems solved.

lowellbrown
4
Points
lowellbrown 03/02/09 - 04:39 pm
0
0
The cartoon accompanying this

The cartoon accompanying this editorial in the print edition shows a gangster-style automatic aimed by the Mexican drug cartel at American cities. You have to wonder which American city the gun came from. Maybe even worked its way through Augusta, GA. Somebody in this country has an awfully good thing going with the Mexican drug dealers. You are absolutely right, though, Chronicle, in stating that America's infatuation with drugs drives the madness. And this is mostly about marijuana, for Pete's sake. I've never believed in legalization of pot, except as a prescription drug. Of course, I only tried it once, a long ago, and suspect it was really oregano. But legalization of pot may be what's necessary to slow down the cartels and go after the producers of crack and meth, for whom the death penalty seems appropriate.

KSL
190283
Points
KSL 03/02/09 - 05:52 pm
0
0
Cain can sit in front of his

Cain can sit in front of his computer while his cash crop of trees grow and call for subjecting people who have to drive to make their living to a $6.00 per gallon gas tax. With all of the compassion he has for terrorists held in Gitmo and Palestinians who harbor terrorists, and the Iraqi people, you would think he would have a little compassion for his fellow citizens who get in their cars to drive to their jobs or in connection with earning a living. My husband had to drive from Aiken to Thomson today for a meeting. He'll be headed to Statesboro tomorrow. He was supposed to go to Albany, but can't because of a funeral.

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