The Guy left out

  • Follow NFL

HATTIESBURG, Miss. --- After two hours of talking about his life and his days with the Oakland Raiders, Thomson, Ga., native Ray Guy turns to a waitress who's been eavesdropping.

"Things happen for a reason. I'm a firm believer in fate, that sooner or later, if you wait long enough and you work hard enough, it will come around."<BR> - Thomson native Ray Guy, on not being in the Hall of Fame  Jim Blaylock/Staff
Jim Blaylock/Staff
"Things happen for a reason. I'm a firm believer in fate, that sooner or later, if you wait long enough and you work hard enough, it will come around."
- Thomson native Ray Guy, on not being in the Hall of Fame

"I bet you'd be surprised to know I never used to talk that much when I was younger," Guy said. "I was bashful."

These days the former Raiders punter is a regular raconteur -- happy to share stories about his work with young football players, trade stories about his All-Pro seasons and describe the new Jack Russell puppy he's adopted for company.

He only hesitates when the conversation is steered to one of his least favorite topics: the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

"I was trying to get your mind off of it," Guy said with a laugh.

When the seven 2009 inductees are announced later this week, Guy already knows he will not be on the list. A seven-time finalist for selection since 1992, most recently in 2007 and '08, Guy didn't make the cut from 25 semifinalists this time around.

You wouldn't know it from meeting him. Guy is all smiles, still slim and trim at 59 with white hair and a touch of a smoker's rasp in his booming Southern drawl.

Friends stop by the table at his favorite haunt to say hello and he's treated much like a celebrity in this small town where he was the starting free safety and punter, a backup quarterback, and a player on the baseball team at Southern Miss 35 years ago.

Were it not for a fellow named Favre, Ray Guy would be the most famous athlete ever to slide through Hattiesburg. There's even an award given by the Greater Augusta Sports Council to college football's best punter named for him.

Most assume he's been granted every honor the man considered by many to be the NFL's greatest punter could garner. But the fact remains: Guy is not in the Hall of Fame. Even worse to Guy, no player whose day job was punting has ever been selected by voters who meet each January.

"I think what I can tell you is, yes, I'm upset, but, no, it's not something I'm going to sit here and dwell on," Guy said over a Miller Lite. "Things happen for a reason. I'm a firm believer in fate, that sooner or later, if you wait long enough and you work hard enough, it will come around."

Truth be told, Guy doesn't have much time to sit around and dwell on it. He's too busy. He now works for Southern Miss, helping to plan the school's 2010 centennial celebration. And he headlines a series of camps for punters and kickers with many of his pupils having gone on to college teams and even the NFL.

He finds the work fulfilling. He's held camps in every state but Alaska and his work at Southern Miss gives him a chance to serve as mentor to young people.

"I love what I'm doing," Guy said. "I'm trying to give back to them. Not just the student-athletes, but the students in general. When you cross that curb over there into real life, I'm trying to relate to them what that's like."

So why isn't Guy in the Hall of Fame? He's heard all the reasons, participated in all the debates. What it really comes down to is punters get no respect. At least placekickers can point to Jan Stenerud, the lone pure kicker in the Hall of Fame.

No, punters must suffer in ignominy, the importance of their position downgraded because they don't score points. A wily punter can help keep the opposing team buried in its own end of the field, giving his team's defense a huge advantage. But there's nothing sexy about punting, nothing voters have found worthy of honoring.

Guy just wants to see a punter in the Hall of Fame, it doesn't matter if it's him. He points to others who are deserving -- the Dolphins' Reggie Roby, the Chiefs' Jerrel Wilson, the Lions' Herman "Thunderfoot" Weaver and the Steelers' Craig Colquitt.

Punters of today also feel the snub and pull for Guy's eventual entry.

"It's football, so a guy who is the best at his position in the game deserves to be in the Hall of Fame," Steelers punter Mitch Berger said. "It's not the Pro Football And Not Kickers Hall of Fame, so if a guy has the statistics and he's been one of the greats in his job, I don't think there's any reason he should be judged unlike any other position. But we all know that's not the real world."

Comments (8) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
Jim-bob
1
Points
Jim-bob 01/26/09 - 03:19 am
0
0
Get over yourself Guy. I

Get over yourself Guy. I don't hear any long-snappers whining they should be in the Hall.

patriciathomas
42
Points
patriciathomas 01/26/09 - 06:51 am
0
0
Guy influenced the out come

Guy influenced the out come of many Raiders games with his punting. A feat of the foot. Something not seen before and seldom since, at least on his level. He changed the way the punting is seen. What is "old hat" now was new when Ray Guy showed how punting was done right. He should be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the AC is right to write of it often.

justthefacts
20365
Points
justthefacts 01/26/09 - 09:21 am
0
0
94 yarder in high school

94 yarder in high school against Aquinas high school if my memory serves me.

jackfruitpaper833
41
Points
jackfruitpaper833 01/26/09 - 10:33 am
0
0
He deserves to be in the Hall

He deserves to be in the Hall NOW, not after he dies (God forbid).

justus4
99
Points
justus4 01/26/09 - 02:30 pm
0
0
A punter, in all actuality is
Unpublished

A punter, in all actuality is not always siginficant in many games. Yes, their job is extremely important, but their efforts are completed in less than ten minutes in the entire game. That seems to be the real point. They only play a few minutes per game, so how can they compete with the other players sweating, bleeding, and breaking bones while punters warm the bench? But if a punter gets in, Guy should be the one.

Jim-bob
1
Points
Jim-bob 01/26/09 - 05:19 pm
0
0
http://www.nfl.com/history/ra

http://www.nfl.com/history/randf/records/indiv/punting Guy is not even listed here. Pick another punter for the Hall. Maybe, 98 yards, Steve O'Neal, N.Y. Jets vs. Denver, Sept. 21, 1969

justthefacts
20365
Points
justthefacts 01/26/09 - 05:56 pm
0
0
Put a guy in the hall based

Put a guy in the hall based on one kick? Why are you so down on Ray?

Jim-bob
1
Points
Jim-bob 01/26/09 - 07:19 pm
0
0
Not down on him at all. If

Not down on him at all. If you will 'check the facts' there all punters with better records and stats.

BobbyHodges
99
Points
BobbyHodges 01/27/09 - 04:26 pm
0
0
I'd take a guy who could put

I'd take a guy who could put it inside the 10 reliably over a guy who could just kick it far any day. Punters are an instrumental weapon in the battle for field position, ESPECIALLY on the college and professional level. If you think punters aren't important, you don't really understand much about football. How many big plays does any player make during a single game? Not many, but it's that sack here or TD run there, or an INT in a clutch play that gets people into the hall of fame. It's not having one amazing game or even season, it's about a career of consistently exceptional play. Guy qualifies.

Back to Top

Top headlines

Fire Department raises sought

The Augusta Fire Depart­ment will present a pay raise proposal for firefighters and administrators to the county’s public safety committee Monday.
Search Augusta jobs