The essentials: remember stuff

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Are you struggling to remember your monologue for drama class, an outline for a speech or your new friend's cell number? The Rev. Jonathan Randall, an associate pastor at Christian Heritage Church in Graniteville who has committed much of the Bible to memory, offers these four methods to effective memorization:

THE PEG METHOD is good for quick memorization, especially of lists. You can't hang your hat on something that's not there. In the same way a peg holds a hat, our minds can often remember things better with something to associate it with.

For instance, if you need to buy milk, bacon and eggs, imagine pouring milk on your head, frying bacon on your shoulder, and cracking an egg in your hand. Then, when you get to the store, pull out your photographic memory (everybody has one) and see the milk, bacon and eggs.

THE JOURNEY METHOD is helpful to memorize outlines. Pick a route you are familiar with, such as the roads from your school to your workplace or the path you take from the kitchen to your bedroom. The first major thing (road, room or building) represents your first point, and so on.

THE Number Method is a fun, easy way to memorize numbers, such as dates or phone numbers. If your hotel room is 432, remember four, three and two with rhyming words such as door, bee and shoe.

THE Repetition Method is best for things such as long poems or passages of Scripture. Get all your senses involved: Read it aloud, listen to yourself, read it, write it out and throw yourself into the situation in your mind. Try to feel what the writer was feeling, think as he would have thought and totally experience the words. Then repeat it many times.

It takes awhile for things to go from your short-term to long-term memory.

The Rev. Randall says that there are other things that could make memorizing easier. Don't try to memorize things shortly after eating a large meal or when you are tired. Walking while you memorize could help.

Rebekah Bryant is a rising home-schooled sophomore.


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