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Boy, 9, drowns; 4th lake death

The body of a 9-year-old boy was recovered from Thurmond Lake by divers Sunday night.

Pam Tucker, director of the Columbia County Emergency Management Agency, said the boy, who was not identified, was reported missing 4:20 p.m. Sunday in the West Dam area.

The drowning was the fourth at Thurmond Lake this season. Three have happened at West Dam and one at Lake Springs, Ms. Tucker said.

The Columbia County Coroner's Office will identify the boy once they're assured that all family members have been notified, she said.


Man charged in rape, beating

Police on Sunday night arrested an Augusta man who was accused of raping, imprisoning and beating an Augusta woman last month.

Anthony Wayne Holden, 43, of the 200 block of Ellis Street, is charged with felony aggravated assault, possession of a knife during the commission of a crime and aggravated sodomy, according to Richmond County jail records.

Police say that on June 27 Mr. Holden burned a 21-year-old woman's face with boiling water, stabbed her several times and raped her.

The victim suffered second-degree burns and required stitches to her body and staples to her head.

Mr. Holden was booked into jail at 10 p.m., according to jail records. He was being held without bond.

Woman dies after car hits metal guardrail

An elderly Augusta woman died in a single-car accident in North Augusta.

Lillian P. Gilchrist, 83, of Providence Drive, was driving a 2005 Kia Sodona west on Jefferson Davis Highway about 1:20 p.m. Saturday.

She lost control of her car, drove onto a grassy median and, after over-correcting, crossed two westbound lanes and struck a metal guardrail, Aiken County Coroner Tim Carlton said.

Mr. Carlton said evidence at the scene indicated that a medical condition might have been involved.

An autopsy Sunday in Newberry, S.C., showed that Ms. Gilchrist suffered a broken neck after striking the guardrail.

She was not wearing a seat belt.

It was the 15th traffic fatality in Aiken County this year, Mr. Carlton said.

Meeting will address process of adoption

Families interested in learning about adoption are invited to attend an Aug. 7 meeting sponsored by the Georgia Department of Human Resources Division of Family and Children Services.

County DFCS and private adoption agencies from throughout Georgia will provide information on specific children, typically those 8 and older, in need of adoptive families.

The event will be held at the Augusta Marriott Hotel and Suites, 2 Tenth St., from 6 to 8 p.m.

For more information, call (877) 242-5774 or visit www.dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov/adoptions.

Red Cross to teach on giving first aid to dogs

The American Red Cross of Augusta is offering a course on giving first aid to dogs.

The class will teach preparedness for animal emergencies and illnesses for a $35 registration fee.

It will be held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 23, at the Augusta Red Cross, 1322 Ellis St.

For more information or to register for the course, contact Dianne Lariscy at (706) 724-8481 or dlariscy@arcaug.org.

Traffic update

Aiken County

- Bluff Avenue will be closed between Georgia and West avenues for several months as crews reconstruct the road.

- Part of Gray Mare Hollow Road is closed to through traffic as crews fix a culvert.

When to water

You cannot water today in Columbia and Richmond counties, which are under Level Two restrictions.

No watering is allowed on Mondays, but on other days, watering is allowed from midnight to 10 a.m. on an even-odd system based on street address.

ODD-NUMBERED ADDRESSES: water on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays.

EVEN-NUMBERED ADDRESSES: water on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

There are no water restrictions in South Carolina's Aiken, Edgefield, Barnwell and McCormick counties.

HOW TO SAVE WATER

Install a low-flow showerhead. They're inexpensive and can save you more than 500 gallons a week.

Source: wateruseitwisely.com

Comments (60) Add comment
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nightcop
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nightcop 07/14/08 - 01:34 am
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stay out of the dam lake

stay out of the dam lake fools. geeze!!!

mike.mosley
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mike.mosley 07/14/08 - 03:25 am
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The problem with the lake is

The problem with the lake is that many of the areas that had beaches with the swim area gradually went from 2ft to around 5-6ft have receded so far that those same beaches are in DEEP water. I have seen places around Keg Creek that goes from 4ft to 20ft in just a few steps!

So, if you have kids, I would suggest you have them wear a life jacket, even if they are just wading in shallow water (because it can change pretty quick)

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 04:14 am
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Supervise you children at all

Supervise you children at all times and teach them to swim! Letting your children near water when they can't swim is like letting them ride on top of your car when you drive.

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 04:16 am
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You get ticketed for driving

You get ticketed for driving without a seatbelt and you get ticketed for driving when you're too young for a license, why are the elderly allowed to drive?

rbk
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rbk 07/14/08 - 05:00 am
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Pt, who are you calling

Pt, who are you calling elderly? At what age do you draw the line? You are going to be elderly too, someday, unless you die from health problems or an accident before then. Test the elderly's driving skills more frequently if that is what it takes, but don't just arbitrarily stop them (us? I'm 65, do you consider me elderly?) from driving if they are still capable.

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 05:21 am
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rbk, I don't know a magic age

rbk, I don't know a magic age (like 16) to use for the elderly limit, but I do know that 83 seems beyond it. An annual driving test needs to be given to the elderly which includes a reaction and decision making part. Maybe starting at age 66.

thedarkesthourisbeforeda
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thedarkesthourisbeforeda 07/14/08 - 06:18 am
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in that case pt, it appears a

in that case pt, it appears a annual driving test should be given to everyone each year. Especially, middle aged women.

christian134
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christian134 07/14/08 - 06:31 am
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Good morning all...Make that

Good morning all...Make that annual driving tests for all middle aged men especially those with cell phones...:-)

christian134
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christian134 07/14/08 - 06:32 am
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People the life jacket may

People the life jacket may not be a fashion statement but it will more than likely assure your child will return home at the end of the day....Wear the jackets when out at the lakes...

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 06:39 am
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While the jackets may appear

While the jackets may appear safe, a large raft would be safer yet. Secure your child so he/she can't fall out and the raft can't turn over. And make them wear rubber gloves to keep their hands dry. And when they're on dry land, make sure they wear helmets and knee, elbow, and shin guards. A 1" thick acrylic bubble would also be a nice place to keep your child.

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 06:43 am
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thedark, in what case? Are

thedark, in what case? Are you saying you don't think better then an 83 year old?

christian134
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christian134 07/14/08 - 06:43 am
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Weelll patricia sounds good

Weelll patricia sounds good to me....If I could make it so I would when it comes to protecting my kids...But low and behold they think I am a nut case...Have to agree I do have a phobia when it comes to a child's safety....Especially my one and only grandson...Oh my what a kid.....:-)

thedarkesthourisbeforeda
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thedarkesthourisbeforeda 07/14/08 - 06:51 am
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I'm beginning to believe you

I'm beginning to believe you don't, pt.

darktall
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darktall 07/14/08 - 07:02 am
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PT needs some attention and

PT needs some attention and at least one real life friend instead of living through this website.

cottoncandy16
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cottoncandy16 07/14/08 - 07:09 am
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I think the people in charge

I think the people in charge of lake should close the lake (beach areas) to swimming until the lake level is back to normal. It's not safe at the level the water is now. Boating is unsafe at this level also. The state needs to step up and stop swimming and boating for now. How many people have to die before something is done?

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 07:27 am
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thedark, what?

thedark, what?

wise ole man
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wise ole man 07/14/08 - 07:39 am
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My prayers are with this

My prayers are with this family as they mourn the death of their child.

yak11
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yak11 07/14/08 - 07:41 am
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I kinda have to agree with

I kinda have to agree with the driving thing. When my Grandmother was in her 60s she lost perception of "speed" she would routinely go 65 through neighborhoods chattering away to the person riding with her and she tended to close her eyes when she spoke.....I woudl like to see "recertification" tests (driving maybe) every 10 years for everyone. Plus after age 62 a recertification every 5 years. The hardest thing for a family to do is take an elderly family member's car keys. It is often their last "vision" of independence. But I remember an elderly man who hit my brother years ago. The impact threw my brother clear but the old man dragged the bike for 3 blocks until he stopped to see what he was dragging. His family refused to take his license...then two years later he hit a 5 year old girl and dragged her for 5 blocks (to death) until the cops stopped him.

40something
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40something 07/14/08 - 07:41 am
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PT, when you start taking

PT, when you start taking away the licenses of the elderly, you are just giving them a reason to give up on life. As long as they are happy and still have their mobility, let them live. I will agree they may need to be tested every 2 years.

luckie
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luckie 07/14/08 - 07:55 am
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For the safety of the

For the safety of the elderly, there is a time when family members (if available) need to make the decision to take away the keys. I knew someone who was 73 and had altzeimers (sorry about the spelling). The man drove far away and did not know where he was. Someone helped him contact a family member and she went and rescued him. He never drove again after that. Sometimes it is better to end it before something drastic happens.

newtothegame
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newtothegame 07/14/08 - 08:01 am
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Well, if we keep our children

Well, if we keep our children in the helmets, shin guards, knee pads, chest protectors, and cups (both boys and girls), then we won't have to stress these "reinstatement tests." The kids will be more apt to survive the unfortunate hits.

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 07/14/08 - 08:13 am
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40something, I'm just saying

40something, I'm just saying that as people age they need to be tested regularly. By the time a human body reaches the late 60's, 2 years is a long time between tests and the standard driving test checks only for minimal ability, not reaction time or decision making or attention span, all of which fall off rapidly as we age. The testing agent can decide when public safety is more important then convenient mobility.

rbk
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rbk 07/14/08 - 08:24 am
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I admit at 65, I am old, (my

I admit at 65, I am old, (my kids say older than dirt) but obviously from PT's comment and solution, I will be elderly next year. I had thought I had more years left before I would be elderly. PT, that means you will be elderly sooner too!

HYPOCRITES 08
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HYPOCRITES 08 07/14/08 - 08:41 am
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Nightcop, what a horrible

Nightcop, what a horrible thing to say. You could have left the fool part out considering the fact that a family just lost a loved one. I do have a problem with anyone that does not know how to swim, being in a lake with or without a life jacket on.

jhuran
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jhuran 07/14/08 - 08:44 am
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I am certainly glad to know

I am certainly glad to know that the man who hurt that young woman is in jail.And no insanity deal, he`s just mean and nasty.

1trugent
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1trugent 07/14/08 - 08:46 am
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There has always been "Swim

There has always been "Swim At Your Own Risk" at Lake Thurmond, but the dangers would be greatly minimized with a little use of common sense and proper supervision.

ONLY THE TRUTH
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ONLY THE TRUTH 07/14/08 - 08:49 am
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Patricia, You usually are

Patricia, You usually are concise and wise and I enjoy your point of view. However, today you have both feet in your mouth!! Almost Nazi-like. Tone it down some to keep your credibility above water.

happythoughts
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happythoughts 07/14/08 - 08:49 am
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Pt, she was only 83, I would

Pt, she was only 83, I would think she was a good driver but had a medical condition that suddenly came upon her. You shouldn't be so critical. If driving skills needed testing it should be for all drivers including you.

ONLY THE TRUTH
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ONLY THE TRUTH 07/14/08 - 08:51 am
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Mike-------you should be

Mike-------you should be cleaning up!!!!!!!!

RockyMayer
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RockyMayer 07/14/08 - 08:58 am
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Rather than limit the

Rather than limit the swimming areas due to "inconsistant depths" just watch your kids. I swim at West Dam often and have never waded off too deep, unexpectedly.

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