Drug tests are priority for Harvick

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Kevin Harvick has received a crash course on privacy laws, learned how long different drugs stay in the system, and tested the drivers and crew chiefs on the teams he owns.

A month after the startling admission by former Craftsman Truck Series driver Aaron Fike that he used heroin on the day of races, Harvick has jumped ahead of NASCAR by requiring the drivers and crew on his Nationwide and Truck Series teams to submit to drug tests.

"This is a very clean environment," said Harvick, who drives in Sprint Cup for Richard Childress Racing. "But we have these incidences happen, as we did with Fike. We need all that to go away."

Fike was never caught in NASCAR's substance abuse program, but he was suspended after he was arrested last year and charged with possession of heroin and drug paraphernalia. He told ESPN The Magazine in April that he used heroin the same day he drove in races.

STAYING PUT: Two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Helio Castroneves said Wednesday he doesn't plan to leave the IRL's IndyCar Series for NASCAR any time soon.

Refuting a story in Wednesday's editions of the Los Angeles Times that speculated on the Brazilian following former IRL stars Sam Hornish Jr. and Dario Franchitti to NASCAR as early as the 2009 season, Castroneves said his comments were taken out of context.

"They asked me questions about thinking about NASCAR," the 33-year-old Castroneves said. "Every driver (is) thinking about NASCAR or new challenges, let's put it this way. But it depends on the opportunity, and my opportunity right now is great being here in IndyCar, especially with the merger."

OWNING UP: Dale Earnhardt Jr. , who owns JR Motorsports and the No. 88 Chevrolet in the Nationwide Series, said he might move that team to the Sprint Cup Series next year.

After saying for years he wasn't interested in owning a Sprint Cup car, he said the cost of doing business in the secondary series, and the expected costs of building a Car of Tomorrow, makes the Nationwide Series a bad investment.


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