AP or not AP: That is the question

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The attitudes toward Advanced Placement exams vary among students. Some value the opportunity of getting as many college credits as they can, while others take AP classes just for the five-point curve.

Mitali Mehta, a senior at Lakeside, is one who is in it for the potential college credit.

"I just want to do science in college so I'm trying to get rid of my history and lit(erature) credits in high school," she said.

This seems to be the focus for many high school students who know what they want to study in college.

Many want to get their extra classes out of the way in high school with the intention of shortening their time in college or just being able to focus on the classes that interest them.

As students get to their senior year, however, some start filtering the tests they take based on their college decision.

Andrew Pak, a senior at Lakeside, said he took AP English two years in a row, which has influenced his decision about taking the test.

"The college I'm going to only accepts one lit credit and only gives a semester credit, so I'm thinking about not taking the exam," he said.

Most teachers at Lakeside understand students' predicaments and do not push them to take exams for credits they cannot use.

Alex Moose, a sophomore at Lakeside, said the real purpose for AP classes is to prepare students for college, and he feels that they go more in depth than regular classes. He's taking AP biology this year.

"I felt it would give me a better feel for the subject and help me decide whether I liked the subject enough to major in it in college," Alex said.

Aarthi Murugappan is a senior at Lakeside High School.


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