Teenagers need to make 'green' trend into lifestyle

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Green is the new black. The biggest teen trend is more than a passion for fashion -- it's an effort for the Earth.

Environmentalism has been a pertinent issue in the United States since the industrialization era. Activists, however, have been working to reduce waste since the beginning of time.

Now, more people, particularly teenagers, are interested in the movement. After popular companies and large corporations joined to support the cause, their patrons followed suit.

Stores such as Goody's and Claire's started selling handbags and jewelry made of recycled materials.

Finally, our generation is taking part in a fad that is actually worthwhile -- saving our Earth before it's too late.

One can only hope that this trend won't be like countless others, such as jelly shoes and Mudd jeans, that come in style one season and out the next.

It is up to us to make a difference and to prevent the waste of potentially useful materials that most people just throw away. We should all pitch in by recycling our paper, plastic, aluminum, concrete, batteries and glass, but also by taking part in the more fun part of the experience -- shopping.

Next time you need a necklace and bracelet set to match that perfect outfit, scoop up an eco-friendly accessory.

Next time you're grocery shopping, consider purchasing a few of those $1 bags to haul your groceries home in. Some stores offer a discount for using those, and for saving them money because they don't have to buy the traditional plastic bags.

When you're going to the gym, fill up a reusable sports bottle with water from the water fountain instead of buying something from the vending machine, then throwing away the plastic bottle. (You can save a lot of money this way, too.)

For a list of recycling centers, see www.local.com. Let's make this one trend that never goes out of style.

Lauren Kellems is a senior at Silver Bluff High School.


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