Troubled veterans deserve our help

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Heartfelt thanks to Ann Carey for her letter ("Man was more than what news said," April 14), bringing us the important, clarifying details of Matt Walker's life and courage. But for her letter, he would have passed as only "homeless."

Here apparently was a U. S. Navy veteran who accomplished a very great deal through education and works, and who was possibly heroic, but got sick with serious depression after his mother died. It happens more often to good people than we like to think. The Careys gave him a job and self-respect and a roof.

Many among us, especially veterans, suffer loss of function after they lose loved ones or experience too much stress. They generally remain responsible for their actions, yet it behooves us all to treat such folks as tolerantly and helpfully as they will let us.

The Careys are also heroes in their own way. Congratulations to them.

Toni Shiver, Augusta

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NotyourDadsBuick
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NotyourDadsBuick 04/22/08 - 09:44 am
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He wasn't homeless. That was

He wasn't homeless. That was a fiction invented by John Edwards that was exposed by Bill O'Reilly. There are no homeless veterans. And PTSD is a fraud also.

JusticeSeeker
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JusticeSeeker 04/22/08 - 10:00 am
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The VAMC of Augusta does an

The VAMC of Augusta does an outstanding job of taking care of its patients.
The credo of the facility is, "Take care of the patients, no matter what."
The teamwork, courtesy, attention and efficiency is an example for all other medical centers.
Having been a recent patient, I can assure that this medical facility makes others pale in comparison.

soldout
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soldout 04/22/08 - 10:35 am
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EFT is very effective for

EFT is very effective for treating these situations. At one VA hospital EFT fixed problems in one day that had not been cured in 20 years of treatment. It is a whole new approach and the information about it is available for free. No drugs or supplements. Search it out if you want help or to help someone. It cheap, easy, fun, and amazing.

jiclemens
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jiclemens 04/22/08 - 10:36 am
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Yes they do, and in spite of

Yes they do, and in spite of Bush's incessant effort to cut their funding in the midst of a major war because "less government is better." The "problem" is, the VA and medicare are a model for state of the are universal health care and we know how poor southerners cringe at the idea of "socialized medicine." At least until your health plan drops your coverage. Assuming you had a health plan to start with.

jiclemens
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jiclemens 04/22/08 - 10:45 am
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I guess EFT stands for

I guess EFT stands for ELECTRONIC FUNDS TRANSFER. Purvis, instead of insulting the fine work done by VA scientists and medical staff why don't you site some VA references and actual peer reviewed studies. You are obviously selling snake-oil and you should be banned from posting here. Your comments are unethical.

soldout
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soldout 04/22/08 - 11:03 am
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EFT stands for emotional

EFT stands for emotional freedom technique and I have nothing to sell. The people doing EFT were invited by the VA. I never insulted anyone. I try to get people to check out new advances that aren't promoted because they are all free are nearly free. I go by the one standard when I inform folks; "you have the right to believe and receive or doubt and do without"

Bizarro
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Bizarro 04/22/08 - 11:14 am
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Emotional Freedom Techniques

Emotional Freedom Techniques and accupuncture. This is proving popular in the UK and has BritMedAss approval, but the BMA study indicated a need for further research. I don't have a problem with it-sorta like chiropracters. It is fine as long as they don't claim they can cure cancer and all this other crap. A study has demonstrated it useful in treating psychosomatic disorders.

jiclemens
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jiclemens 04/22/08 - 01:41 pm
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The studies done thus far

The studies done thus far have NOT demonstrated it is useful. The sample sizes are not sufficient to rule out placebo effect or effacacy. You might as well take an aspirin. Most reviewers consider it pseudoscience. It is irresponsible to taut or exagerate it's unproven benefits to veterans and other patients at risk of confusing snake-oil for real medicine and not getting the care they need. Suicidal tendencies and other effects of war trauma should not be trivialized.

Bizarro
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Bizarro 04/22/08 - 08:52 pm
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Wooh! I said the BMA advised

Wooh! I said the BMA advised more studies, but found it relatively safe with little risks. Note the study I mentioned was psychosomatic illness-in their friggin head. I am not much for voodoo medicine, but accupuncture is interesting-the mind body connection. All the studies (I have read) of accupuncture are from the Chinese, which I have question the validity of such studies. Purvis is always pushing the voodoo medicine and I agree that it is irresponsible.

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