Girls compete to raise funds for scholarship

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The Little Miss Charmante Pageant has a special place in Barbara Pulliam's heart.

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Karenia Clark helps 9-year-old daughter Samaria prepare during the Little Miss Charmante Pageant at Glenn Hills Middle School.  Chris Thelen/Staff
Chris Thelen/Staff
Karenia Clark helps 9-year-old daughter Samaria prepare during the Little Miss Charmante Pageant at Glenn Hills Middle School.

"This is something I hold very close to me. It means a lot to see the young girls out there on stage participating in the pageant, having fun," she said. "It also means a lot knowing that, at the same time, we are also raising money to send a student to college."

Held at Glenn Hills Middle School on Friday, the pageant featured nine girls ages 8-12 who competed in talent, casual and formal wear, and intellectual responses. Toniqua Freeman, a third-grade Collins Elementary School pupil, won the night's overall title, Little Miss Charmante.

Mrs. Pulliam organized the pageant 10 years ago as a way to raise funds for the Robbie Robinson Scholarship Foundation, founded in memory of her brother, Robert Robinson, who was killed at his law office in Savannah in 1989 by a mail bomb.

Each year, the foundation awards a $1,500 scholarship to a graduating high school senior in Richmond or Chatham counties who plans to attend Savannah State University, Paine College or the University of Georgia.

"He was an energetic person and was very much into politics and education," Mrs. Pulliam said of her brother. "We thought nothing could be more fitting than to honor him in memory through something that would be helping a person who wants to get a higher education in a service area like being a doctor or lawyer."

To be considered for the scholarship, students must have at least a C plus average and have a financial need.

"They also have to write an essay on their perception of what the struggle in civil rights has meant to them and the impact that it has had on today's society," Mrs. Pulliam said.

Mrs. Pulliam said she's pleased to see the pageant reach its 10th year.

"It means that we have been able to perpetuate his memory by helping children in need who want to get an education," she said. "It's good to know that we are helping someone get a college education."

Reach Nikasha Dicks at (706) 823-3336 or nikasha.dicks@augustachronicle.com.

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christian134
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christian134 04/19/08 - 07:48 am
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I have to ask this question,

I have to ask this question, but first let me say overall this is a wonderful project and incentive to the children who seek to particpate and possibly win, that being said back to the question...Wondering if the children not of the black persuasion have a chance when they write their paper on civil rights and what it means in their struggle...do they have a chance of winning?

pearl
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pearl 04/19/08 - 08:51 am
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Did you read anywhere in the

Did you read anywhere in the article about race being a pre-requisite to compete in this pageant? If not, I would say that any "persuasion" would be eligible.

christian134
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christian134 04/19/08 - 12:05 pm
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30909 not to many others have

30909 not to many others have "civil rights struggle" as part of their daily teachings now do they? Okay maybe illegals who are having problems, American Indians, or Muslims.....The obvious is quite obvious....at least by the wording of the above article...Not putting to fine a point on the subject....:-)

FallingLeaves
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FallingLeaves 04/19/08 - 02:03 pm
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Barbara Pulliam has done a

Barbara Pulliam has done a lovely thing to honor her brother, but I was wondering the same thing as Christian134. I realize it's not "politically correct" to mention it, so let's mention it: The topic of the essay seems to exclude whites, but doesn't necessarily. However, it is doubtful many white young ladies would attempt to write such an essay, because the white young ladies would no doubt consider it a waste of effort because their perception would most likely be discounted. This doesn't make the scholarship something that shouldn't be allowed or discouraged, but I do hope there are other opportunities for scholarships for the few white or other minority children that are struggling to survive in the Glenn Hills school system, if there are any left by the age of 9 or 10. One of my son's friends attended Glenn Hills High School one summer by choice to add credits, not for punishment, and determined she never would again. She is a preacher's daughter and described it as a "ghetto school". And before you scream, "She's a racist!" she is black, so skip it. I hope many people will follow Ms. Pulliam's example & arrange unique scholarship opportunities for unique & deserving children.

pearl
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pearl 04/19/08 - 04:36 pm
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Please enlighten me on what

Please enlighten me on what civil rights struggles 8-12 year old girls have encountered in their short life span. Are you saying someone of another "persuasion" could not write an essay on what impact the civil rights movement has had on society as a whole? Next question...is the individuals race listed anywhere on the essay?

christian134
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christian134 04/19/08 - 04:47 pm
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30909 now I know from the

30909 now I know from the content of your remarks you are an educated person so let us pretend for a moment that your last remarks have merit.....Now pretense is over you are going to have to go back and read the article to really undertand what I am saying....I know you can so just give it a shot......If you have children then you have somewhere along the lines influenced them (teachings) each day of their lives....If you do not then I don't believe you can grasp what I am saying....By the by children are extremely smart at that age..They are like sponges they soak up everything around them.....Understand...:-)

pearl
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pearl 04/19/08 - 05:30 pm
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christian134...I understand

christian134...I understand what you're saying. Now, that being said...I have a 18 yr old son in college, and I hope somewhere along the line I have influenced him to be all that he can be, and to respect all people regardless of race. I want him to know about the civil rights struggle and what it meant. However, I don't want him to focus all of his energies dwelling on the past. I want him to focus his energies on the future and how to make it better. I believe you should never forget from whence you came, but look forward to where you're going.

christian134
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christian134 04/19/08 - 07:17 pm
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That being said I think your

That being said I think your son being in college is so great....I have several children ranging from 40 down and I too have given them roots to be proud....But not to the point of living in a past they had no control over...The future is all in front of them no reason to keep looking back....Have a great night....:-)

pearl
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pearl 04/19/08 - 08:06 pm
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Thank you. You have a great

Thank you. You have a great night also.

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