Just send down the rain water!

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There is one way to look at lake level arguments that would solve the whole problem of what the state owning the lake should and should not do about water releases.

First if the water that is allowed to flow out of a lake is only that which comes in from rains, the states downstream are then getting the same water they would be receiving if no lake had been built.

Furthermore if someone downstream wants a bigger pool of water they can accomplish this by building their own lake.

Stated another way no state should be required to send more water downstream than would have been present if no lake existed.

Using this logic all one has to do is declare where the bottom should be for a given lake. Once the bottom is reached the water releases would then match the amount of water coming in from rain so that the lake level stops decreasing.

If Lake Thurmond were declared to be at bottom at 325 ft (5 ft below normal fill) the only affect of a major drought such as the one now in progress would be reduced power generation. Issues connected with water flows south of the lake would revert back to what would have been if no lake existed.

Jerry Clontz, Aiken, S.C.

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Fishboy
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Fishboy 02/18/08 - 05:46 am
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I continue to be amazed at

I continue to be amazed at how ignorant people are about our water resources. The Corps DOES have a drought contingency plan that incrementally reduces outflows based on lake levels. When the lake falls to 312 ft., outflow equals inflow. Hopefully, it won't get that low.

Mrs Genevive Bait
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Mrs Genevive Bait 02/18/08 - 01:53 pm
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If everyone just started

If everyone just started saving their spit in milk jugs for a month or two and then poured that into the reservoirs all at once we'd have more water than we ever needed. Just think people, it's really pretty simple!

PLAYLIKETHUNDER4
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PLAYLIKETHUNDER4 02/18/08 - 02:16 pm
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pardon me, but i suppose you

pardon me, but i suppose you three people actually drive on the highway,have children and vote???
just kidding.....

Little Lamb
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Little Lamb 02/18/08 - 02:17 pm
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However, Fishboy, there is a

However, Fishboy, there is a mandated minimum flow out of Lake Lanier that is not changed during droughts. That minimum flow was exposed this year as being for the benefit of the fishing and shellfish (mussels) industries in Florida.

JAS
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JAS 02/18/08 - 03:09 pm
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Why is it that GA Power can

Why is it that GA Power can keep Lake Oconee at or above full pool throughout a drought and the Corps allows it's lakes to drop to such dangerously low levels?

Lou Stewall
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Lou Stewall 02/18/08 - 04:07 pm
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Lake Oconee is a

Lake Oconee is a re-regulation dam like Lake Russell. Each night water is pumped upstream so it can be re-used to make electricity during the day. They have to keep lakes like that from dropping too low. I agree with Mr. Clontz but he is forgetting about increased evaporation due to lakes. However, I cannot believe the Corps wouldn't even capture the rainfall that has landed right on the lake this winter, much less refill by several feet! They do NOT need to send so much water downstream when rain is falling across the entire watershed. There is definitely some greed involved, IMHO.

Fishboy
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Fishboy 02/18/08 - 07:15 pm
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More ignorance. Lake Oconee

More ignorance. Lake Oconee is only 19,000 acres with 374 miles of shoreline; Clark's Hill is 71,000 acres with 1,200 miles of shoreline. If you put the same amout of water in two different-sized buckets, the smaller bucket will fill up more quickly. There is no greed, here. Electricity generated from Clarks Hill is sold to private utilities in the region and helps to keep our power bills some of the lowest in the country.

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