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Cal Thomas' column in The Augusta Chronicle on Jan. 9 ("Segregation, Muslim style") is a perfect example of why Franklin Roosevelt was right when he said: "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

Mr. Thomas' description of Muslims taking over Britain by establishing "no-go zones" for non-Muslims, and their scheme to have more babies than non-Muslims, is a fear-based idea and does nothing to resolve the real problem of militant Islamic fundamentalism. I would encourage Mr. Thomas and all like-minded people to read Karen Armstrong's book The Battle for God: A History of Fundamentalism . It's a difficult book to read, but if you can force yourself to finish this scholarly book, it answers many questions that Mr. Thomas and others like him seem to ignore -- which leads to ignorance.

There is no doubt we have trouble with militant Islamic fundamentalism -- the same troubles we have with other ideologies such as fascism, communism and racism. These militant Islamic fundamentalists consider "democracy" an ideology that they fear, for the same reasons Mr. Thomas fears the idea that Muslims will take over the world if we don't do something.

What is the solution? How can we intelligently address the problem of "radical Islam" if we base our solutions on fear-based ignorance? Decisions based on fear can make you do some crazy things (such as trying to spread democracy with a bayonet or using suicide bombers) to solve the problem. This explains why President Bush's invasion of Iraq will never be accepted in the Muslim world: because it's exactly what they have feared since the ages of colonization and imperialism.

The idea of no-go zones for non-Muslims and a heavy dose of procreation won't solve the problem, either. The problems we face today are not new; they are old -- very old.

Larry Jarrett, Warrenville, S.C.

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mgroothand
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mgroothand 01/12/08 - 01:52 pm
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Issue a Fatwah to the

Issue a Fatwah to the radicals: Another 9/11 and we bomb the holy sites in Mecca and/or Medina.

howcanweknow
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howcanweknow 01/12/08 - 04:00 pm
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Not sure exactly what Mr.

Not sure exactly what Mr. Jarrett's point is, other than we need to try and understand Islam better. Guess that's a good idea. I do understand this much: Christianity teaches that we should love our enemies and do good to those who harm us. On the other hand, Islam, a self-proclaimed religion of peace, teaches that all non-believers (infidels) are to be killed. There is indeed much to fear if Islam were to take over the world. This is not fear-based ignorance, this is fact-based truth. It is Mr. Jarrett that needs to consider the facts more carefully. There is much more to fear here than just fear itself.

dani
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dani 01/12/08 - 04:11 pm
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The letter doesn't make a

The letter doesn't make a whole lot of sense. I will just continue to believe Cal Thomas ahead of the woman he mentions. I've been listening to and reading Cal Thomas for ages and I have no problem with him.__
If ms. Armstrong' book is hard to read, then it perhaps that is because it's not truthful. The truth is never hard to understand,

patriciathomas
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patriciathomas 01/12/08 - 05:16 pm
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I, too, don't exactly

I, too, don't exactly understand the perspective of this letter. Radical Islam is easily understood. A living radical will kill everyone but another radical. A dead one won't.

Bizarro
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Bizarro 01/12/08 - 05:57 pm
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Both Christianity and Islam

Both Christianity and Islam seek to spread their religion. Islam is also government so its spread is imperialistic in nature. There have been a number of muslim dynasties. I think it would be prudent for the Europeans to be wary of the spread of Islam. Populations displace others all the time. Probably in 20-30 years caucasians will be a minority in this country.

AugustKroner
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AugustKroner 01/12/08 - 06:03 pm
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Jarrett's response to Cal

Jarrett's response to Cal Thomas's on the dangers of radical islamic enclaves in England, and elsewhere shows he is a self- deluding fool. Redefining problems in terms of some politically correct but counterintuitive formula is the typical liberal alternative to facing reality and doing something about the problem. It will take another 9/11 (maybe two or three) to wake up people like Jarrett. But maybe even that would not work. He would probably insist we need dialogue with these killers so we could understand why they hate us, and how WE need to change !

WW1949
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WW1949 01/12/08 - 09:13 pm
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I don't know why the world

I don't know why the world doesn't blow Iraq off the face of the earth and dare the others to act up.

crackerjack
150
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crackerjack 01/12/08 - 09:22 pm
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To stop radical islam, we

To stop radical islam, we have to bury them wrapped in pig skin, so they will not be accepted in their hereafter.

Fundamental_Arminian
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Fundamental_Arminian 01/12/08 - 11:19 pm
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Mr. Jarrett could've improved

Mr. Jarrett could've improved his letter by mentioning at least one question and answer that Cal Thomas and other like-minded folks have ignored about radical Islam. He also could've explained why we should trust Karen Armstrong, an ex-nun turned Jesus Seminar member, whose pre-9/11 book has been criticized for saying very little about Wahhabism although Wahhabism had been recognized as a danger for more than a decade.

afadel
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afadel 01/27/08 - 10:26 am
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Dani's comment is really

Dani's comment is really scary:

If Ms. Armstrong' book is hard to read, then it perhaps that is because it's not truthful. The truth is never hard to understand,

Does she advocate banning higher education so people can't be infected by hard-to-read books?

What we believe is typically what we hear a lot (whether it be an AM radio talk show or a university professor or a parent), and a differing opinion is always going to seem "hard to read." Moreover, everyone has biases. The most typical bias is "Someone who looks like me or talks like me or says he identifies with me, well, that person must be good since I'm good. And someone who does not look like me or talk like me or identify with me must be bad." So if we're ever going to be able to understand each other, we must be prepared to have some difficulty "reading."

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