Want New Year's dinner?

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Sebrena Muirhead waits for customers behind a mound of collard greens on Walton Way. "I try to stay in the community and if everybody supports me, I'll be here every Saturday," she said. She was selling Monday, before New Year's Day, when a meal of collard greens and black-eyed peas traditionally is eaten for good luck. Georgia is first and South Carolina third in the nation for collard growing.  Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Sebrena Muirhead waits for customers behind a mound of collard greens on Walton Way. "I try to stay in the community and if everybody supports me, I'll be here every Saturday," she said. She was selling Monday, before New Year's Day, when a meal of collard greens and black-eyed peas traditionally is eaten for good luck. Georgia is first and South Carolina third in the nation for collard growing.
 
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