Accused pair are out for 15 days

  • Follow Baseball

NASHVILLE, Tenn. --- Jose Guillen and Jay Gibbons were suspended Thursday for the first 15 days of next season for violating baseball's drug policy, an indication how the sport might treat players named in the Mitchell steroids investigation.

Guillen and Gibbons were accused in media reports of receiving human growth hormone (HGH) after January 2005, when it was banned by baseball.

Gary Matthews Jr. , Rick Ankiel , Troy Glaus and Scott Schoeneweis also were linked to HGH, but baseball decided there was "insufficient evidence" to determine they committed a doping violation. They were accused of receiving performance-enhancing drugs before 2005.

Former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell was hired by baseball commissioner Bud Selig in March 2006 to investigate drugs in baseball, and his report is to be released by the end of the month.

Guillen instructed the players' association to file a grievance, which would be decided by an arbitrator. Gibbons will not challenge his penalty.

DIAMONDBACKS: Infielder Augie Ojeda avoided salary arbitration, agreeing to a one-year contract worth $550,000.

Ojeda filled in for injured second baseman Orlando Hudson down the stretch this season, helping Arizona wrap up the NL West title.

He batted .274 with one home run and 12 RBI in 57 games.

PADRES: Offered a one-year contract to left fielder Milton Bradley , who tore a knee ligament late last season when his manager spun him to the ground while trying to keep him from going after an umpire.

Sam Levinson , one of Bradley's agents, confirmed that the sides are talking.

DODGERS: New manager Joe Torre had knee replacement surgery this week.

Los Angeles Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti said the former Yankees skipper's operation took place Wednesday.

The 67-year-old Torre, a former major league catcher, had said for several years that he needed the operation. He had limped more noticeably during the past year.


Top headlines

New SafeHomes facility breaks ground

SafeHomes of Augusta broke ground Thursday on a larger facility that will allow the nonprofit agency to house more than twice the number of clients than its current shelter can hold.
Search Augusta jobs