News you can use

  • Follow Metro


RECYCLING SAVES ENERGY


- Don't dispose of your dead car battery. Recycle it. The typical car battery contains 18-20 pounds of lead-acid, a toxic substance that can cause serious adverse health effects if not disposed of properly. Contact your local government for recycling sites.


- Organize a recycling program in your office or community if one isn't already in place.


- Buy recycled products.


- Use a mug for coffee at work and home rather than a disposable cup.


- Purchase long-lasting, durable items rather than disposable ones.


- Use rechargeable batteries instead of disposable batteries.


- Start a compost pile.


- Buy the economy size of products when feasible. You will probably save money, and it will reduce the number of containers being thrown away.


- Buy products that have the smallest amount of packaging materials.


- Request that your name not be sold to mailing list companies. The average American receives an amount of junk mail each year that is equivalent to 1.5 trees.


- Recycle old newspapers, glass bottles, plastic bottles, tin and aluminum cans.


- Use a mulching mower to mow your lawn. You'll do your lawn good by putting the lawn cuttings back into the soil and you'll eliminate the need to dispose of these cuttings. The cuttings will serve as a mulch, retaining moisture in the soil, and are a natural fertilizer.


SOURCE: United States Navy



Department of the Navy's Energy Program


Friends Bill Williams (left) and Alfred Mitchell play a game of racquetball Monday at the Diamond Lakes Community Center in Hephzibah. They play about three or four times a week.  Annette M. Drowlette/Staff
Annette M. Drowlette/Staff
Friends Bill Williams (left) and Alfred Mitchell play a game of racquetball Monday at the Diamond Lakes Community Center in Hephzibah. They play about three or four times a week.

TODAY

42ND ANNUAL COLUMBIA COUNTY MERCHANTS FALL FAIR: opens at 5 p.m.; at the Columbia County Fairgrounds off Columbia Road across from Patriots Park; will run through Saturday with gates opening at 5 p.m. weekdays, and noon Saturday; fair hotline is (706) 210-3603.

MOLD SEMINAR BY DR. ANDREW CAMPBELL: 6:30 p.m.; Jabez Sanford Hardin Performing Arts Center, in Evans; (706) 595-7620.

TUESDAY NIGHTS TOGETHER, SINGLES FELLOWSHIP: 7 p.m.; administration building of First Baptist Church of North Augusta, 625 Georgia Ave.; for area single adults; fellowship and Bible study; (803) 279-6370.

MONA-VIE TASTING PARTY: 7 p.m., Balancing Your Health, 4901 Columbia Road, Grovetown; (706) 364-2270.

TUESDAY'S MUSIC LIVE: Pianist Konstantin Soukhovetski; noon Tuesday, St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Sixth and Reynolds streets at Riverwalk Augusta; lunch by Very Vera, $7, reservations required for lunch; call (706) 722-3463.

FREE WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday; East Central Regional Hospital, 3405 Mike Padgett Highway; consultants from Yale University will present free workshop; held by the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

HARLEM'S LAUREL AND HARDY MUSEUM: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; downtown Harlem; closed on Sundays and Mondays; (706) 556-0401.

AIKEN GENERAL AVIATION COMMISSION: 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Aiken Municipal Airport.

AIKEN DESIGN REVIEW BOARD: 6:30-7:30 p.m.; room 214 at City Hall.

SPEECH AND HEARING SCREENINGS: By appointment Monday-Friday, University Hospital Speech and Hearing Center, 1430 Harper St., Suite C3, or Professional Center 2, Suite 102, 4321 University Parkway, Evans; $10 for children and adults; (706) 774-5777.

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT : Daily, University Hospital, Weight Management and Nutrition Center, 4106 Columbia Road; $35; registration required; (706) 868-3241.


Top headlines

Nuke supplier agrees to changes after cheating

ATLANTA - A manufacturer making parts for two nuclear plants in the Southeast has promised to better train its employees after investigators accused three workers of cheating on a qualification ...
Search Augusta jobs