A good move for golf

  • Follow Editorials

Ah, for the good old days, when the only drugs found on a golf course were nicotine, alcohol and occasionally an aspirin.

Now the major governing organizations of golf - including the Augusta National Golf Club - have announced they have agreed to an anti-doping policy to begin in 2008. PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem has released a list of banned substances, and said that the policy will be coordinated worldwide.

Golfers on steroids? It sounds like a comedy skit. Readers can insert their own joke here.

But the decision makes sense. The integrity and civility of golf fit perfectly with a drug policy that encourages and strongly assures honest play. The sport's highest officials should be praised.

Citing a skill set that rewards accuracy rather than brute strength, speed or prolonged endurance, officials repeatedly have said that they don't think drugs are a problem in golf. But noting that other sports have been wracked by drug scandals in recent times, they said they felt the need to take the step.

The issue made headlines during the British Open when one of golf's legends, Gary Player, told reporters that he knew of at least 10 players who were taking some form of drugs (he never named them).

Golf is a gentleman's (and lady's) game, and one that has a history and tradition of honor and honesty. But today, on the professional level, the purses have gotten so large ... well, people will do a lot of strange things for money.

Let's hope no one ever tests positive.

Comments (4) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
Signal Always
3
Points
Signal Always 09/25/07 - 08:24 am
0
0
This is one of the most

This is one of the most unnecessary moves in Golf. The sport is no where near football or baseball in that driving, if one can argue that "muscling up" has an affect, is only a very small part of the game. Steroids will do nothing for a short game. Might as well ban steroids in synchronized swimming as well. Makes about as much sense. Way to overreact, PGA.

sjgraci
2
Points
sjgraci 09/25/07 - 11:13 am
0
0
The modern game is about

The modern game is about athleticism and strength. Physical endurance plays as much of a role in winning as mental endurance. The two effect each other down the stretch. Steroids help the body recover quicker when injured. It is not about bulking up like some muscle head in the gym. Not all steroids will do that. Many mild steroids are used to increase lean body mass to people with burns, wounds, and cachexia. It is not uncommon to have little old ladies on steroids to bulk up. When healthy atheletes take these mild steroids they too gain muscle but don't end up looking like something out of WWE as a result. It is without question that steroids could play a role in improving a golfers power game and increase his physical endurance. What everyone is overlooking are drugs that enhance a golfers mental and emotional performance. Long before steroids entered the picture, it has been quietly talked about that some tour players are on anti depressants and anti anxiety meds. Now, these meds may not help you bomb it 350 yards but they may settle you down enough to hit the fairway. Oxandralone may not help you make that three foot putt but Zoloft may. Should these drugs be tested as well?

Signal Always
3
Points
Signal Always 09/25/07 - 11:44 am
0
0
Do you play golf?

Do you play golf?

titleist
0
Points
titleist 09/25/07 - 03:39 pm
0
0
Hey SIGNAL. Look dude, if

Hey SIGNAL. Look dude, if you are a golf fan AT ALL then you already KNOW that the PGA is a PROACTIVE organization, one that likes to fix problems before they start or get out of control. They aren't going to WAIT until their record-books are rife with inflated stats. Your reation tells me you fancy yourself some sort of EXPERT on the topic. Well if you were, you wouldn't make the statement if you did. You would if you were a KNOW IT ALL, though.

Back to Top

Search Augusta jobs