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TAKE CAUTION IN THE HEAT

Heat and humidity are a bad combination as humid air slows evaporation of sweat from your skin. Evaporation helps keep you cool on hot days. To help prevent heat illness, take these precautions:

Julia Bedenstein, 7, who plays Jip the dog in The Adventures of Dr. Dolittle, has her face painted at Monte Sano Elementary School. The play was part of the Art Factory's summer camp program  Annette M. Drowlette/Staff
Annette M. Drowlette/Staff
Julia Bedenstein, 7, who plays Jip the dog in The Adventures of Dr. Dolittle, has her face painted at Monte Sano Elementary School. The play was part of the Art Factory's summer camp program

- Plan outdoor activities early or late in the day or reduce the intensity if working out.

- Stay in the shade if possible.

- Wear lightweight and light-colored clothing, preferably the type that helps wick away sweat.

- Minimize the amount of clothing you wear.

- Wear a hat and sunscreen.

- Allow a few days to give your body time to get used to the heat before you engage in strenuous activity.

- People who are overweight or have other medical conditions should note that they are at high risk for dehydration and heat illness. They should consult their physician before starting any exercise program.

The biggest mistake people make in the heat is not hydrating properly. Follow these guidelines before you work, exercise or play outside:

- Don't use thirst as your guide. If you wait until you are thirsty to hydrate, it is too late.

- Water is good for general hydration. If you are exercising strenuously or for more than an hour, drinks such as Powerade or Gatorade that contain salt and carbohydrates are better.

- Drink 16 ounces to 20 ounces of fluid one hour to two hours before you exercise.

- Take drink breaks every 20 minutes, especially if you are active for longer than one hour.

- Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which cause you to dehydrate more rapidly.

Remember, heat illness can range from heat cramps to heat exhaustion to heat stroke. Heat stroke is dangerous and requires immediate medical attention. Help prevent a more serious problem by knowing the early warning signs:

- Thirst

- Cramps

- Irritability

- Headache

- Weakness

- Dizziness

- Nausea

- Decreased performance

If you experience signs of dehydration, take yourself out of the heat immediately, cool down with a fan and drink fluids. If you do not recover or have a more serious problem, seek medical attention immediately.

Source: Dr. Steven Greer, Medical College of Georgia Sports Medicine Center



AROUND TOWN

TODAY

NIPPLES TO THE WIND: 8 p.m. today and 2 p.m. Sunday; Imperial Theatre, 745 Broad St.; $35; imperialtheatre.com

AUGUSTA GREENJACKETS: Baseball team faces Lexington Legends, 7:05 p.m.; $1-$10; Lake Olmstead Stadium, 78 Milledge Road; (706) 736-7889

SAFE SITTER: 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Doctors Hospital Cradle Club classroom, Medical Office Building I, Suite 310; teaches children ages 11-13 safe child-care techniques, behavior management and appropriate responses to medical emergencies; $25 per pupil; (706) 651-2450 or www.doctors-hospital.net

SUNDAY

candlelight jazz series: Vintage Jazz Quintet, 8-9:30 p.m., Eighth Street bulkhead at Riverwalk Augusta; $6; (706) 821-1754

SINGLE ADULTS LUNCH: 12:15 p.m., First Sunday Lunch for Single Adults; meat and drinks provided; bring a side dish or dessert; First Baptist Church of North Augusta, 625 Georgia Ave.; free; call to sign up, (803) 279-6370

CRISIS INTERVENTION FOR YOUTH WORKERS: 4-6 p.m., West Acres Baptist; (706) 860-6573


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