County must be fiscally responsible

  • Follow Letters

Columbia County, the answer is not more money! So we need to be thinking about another penny tax increase? Do Columbia County's leaders not know how many pennies are in a dollar?

Why can we not operate like a business that relies on customers to stay in business? Businesses would love for the solution to be a rise in prices. But instead, they work to find ways to cut the cost of operating; become lean and keen; use the people to turn out more at lower cost; and cut waste and people who are not needed.

Why do people we put in office work to make their departments bigger and add more buildings? Do we need more projects or is this a smoke screen? Everyone does not play disc golf. Improve what we have, and let the private sector build playgrounds.

Howard Price, Martinez

Comments (10) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
750
Points
Barry Paschal 06/29/07 - 07:01 am
0
0
The discussion in Columbia

The discussion in Columbia County is about continuing the current sales tax, not adding another penny. The current SPLOST expires in 2010, so the commission is making plans to prepare the referendum in 2008 for approval of the next five-year cycle of the tax.

deekster
24
Points
deekster 06/29/07 - 07:43 am
0
0
We will only add this "one

We will only add this "one cent tax" for a brief period. You get to vote on it. (-:

That is what was said when sales tax was "three cent" and it went to the state government.

Then it was another "penny" and another "penny" and another "penny" and another "penny".

Irresponsibly and uniformed voters are in part responsible for allowing our "public servants" to spend "our money" like it was "pennies from heaven".

deekster
24
Points
deekster 06/29/07 - 07:54 am
0
0
Where did the "one cent" go

Where did the "one cent" go that was collected to extend "RiverWatch Pkwy" to Evans? The 2007 Atlas shows "RiverWatch Pkwy" ending and intersecting with Pleasant Home Rd. It doesn't go into Columbia County? Look it up!!

Who decided we needed "handicapped" crosswalks at every intersection in to county. No sidewalks. No pedestrian traffic. Will be next be told to park our cars and walk to the store?

Local option sales tax is a license to steal in hands of a few would be progresses. You would not want to live in the "Atlanta bedroom communities" they pretend to be are copying.

THINK BEFORE YOU VOTE.

fd1962
26
Points
fd1962 06/29/07 - 08:25 am
0
0
Let's see, we're in the
Unpublished

Let's see, we're in the second five year SPLOST, I think. One of the promises of the first SPLOST was to pave most remaining Columbia County dirt roads. Still only minor progress. No doubt the referendum for SPLOST THREE will promise to pave the rural roads?! The bumpkins in McDuffie County managed to pave 95% of their roads by 1995, plus create a nearly countywide water system while our experts built monuments and a gazillion lighted (all night long) athletic fields. North and west of Robt. Few Pky. need a referendum on sesession.

Carleton Duvall
6308
Points
Carleton Duvall 06/29/07 - 10:02 am
0
0
I guess on the positive side

I guess on the positive side it is better that these funds come from a sales tax levy than from a property tax hike.

750
Points
Barry Paschal 06/29/07 - 10:05 am
0
0
Anecdotal and ill-informed

Anecdotal and ill-informed comments do little to improve public dialogue. The county has made significant progress in paving dirt roads. Most of delays come not from the county, but from landowners who do not want to donate or sell right-of-way and instead fight and force condemnation. Every dollar spent forcing a landowner to provide right-of-way is one more dollar that can't be spent on pavement. Also, when complaining about those crosswalks and the progress on various projects, make sure you know the difference between a state highway project and a county project. River Watch Parkway is a state project, not a county project. Right-of-way acquisition has to be finished before it can be extended, and most of it is complete. Construction isn't even scheduled to begin until 2010.

intheknow
16
Points
intheknow 06/29/07 - 10:50 am
0
0
he has spoken.

he has spoken.

fd1962
26
Points
fd1962 06/29/07 - 03:11 pm
0
0
Anecdotal and ill-informed,
Unpublished

Anecdotal and ill-informed, my [filtered word]. Significant progress in paving Columbia County dirt roads depends on the road's geographic distance from the heart of esteemed government activity. Bet it wouldn't take fourteen years of broken promises to condemn right of way and pave a Martinez or Evans dirt road, would it? Enough sanctimonious apologist comments from these taxpayers' burdens. Fourteen years is enough. The tax money was collected years ago, earning nice interest, which can pay for plenty of condemnation action. Get it done. Then public dialogue will improve.

750
Points
Barry Paschal 06/29/07 - 04:16 pm
0
0
Sounds like someone unhappy

Sounds like someone unhappy about the dirt road in front of his house. I guess you were blindfolded when you bought it. In any event, which road are you talking about, fd1962?

fd1962
26
Points
fd1962 06/29/07 - 05:39 pm
0
0
Bill Dorn Road, five miles
Unpublished

Bill Dorn Road, five miles west of the old court house. When I purchased 27 years ago the surface was red clay, manicured religiously each week by a responsive County. A decade ago the County began to dump periodic loads of stone and crushed asphalt pieces from rebuilding 'other' paved roads along its length, while simultaneously reducing the maintenance grading to once each 4-6 weeks. Meanwhile the number of residential units using the road has increased from 8 in 1980 to 39 at the present. The road is usually in deplorable condition, and is not even a shortcut for tourists to anywhere. Every two years the County sends out survey crews to re-stake and re-pin the boundaries. For what? Practice? Guess too many Democrats live in this area. McDuffie County, one mile away, has been paving every cowpath for twenty years. It's nice to live in a more elite county though; we are so advanced, and have unlimited access to frisbee golf.

forreal
0
Points
forreal 06/29/07 - 08:04 pm
0
0
Now I understand why you all

Now I understand why you all in Columbia Co. want Jim Whitehead to go to Washington. It sounds like he did a great job getting your roads paved when he was a Commissioner. But he was selling tires and it might be better for his business not to have good roads.

johnsmith
9
Points
johnsmith 06/29/07 - 09:43 pm
0
0
Thank *goodness* Mr. Paschal

Thank *goodness* Mr. Paschal is here to enlighten all us poor ignoramuses... You know, it's interesting how someone with a vested interest in an issue can manage to tell us pore ol' country mice that what we see and experience is not really happening...

750
Points
Barry Paschal 06/29/07 - 09:46 pm
0
0
I've lived in Columbia County

I've lived in Columbia County my entire life, and grew up on a dirt road; the county has never graded dirt roads weekly, religiously or otherwise. Memories do have a way of romanticizing themselves into some non-existent ideal, however, turning wishful thinking into reality.

Whatever the case, I suspect the growth on your road is partly to blame for the slow paving process. Increasing from 8 units to 39 indicates many of those parcels have been subdivided, creating new owners who might not be interested in having the road paved. And when the county is prioritizing road projects, they take the path of least resistance and least cost; if landowners force condemnation, commissioners simply move on to another road where landowners want paving. It's easier, and it's cheaper for all the other taxpayers who foot the bill.

I suspect that rather than blame the county, you should ask whether your neighbors are standing in the way of progress.

Back to Top
loading...
Search Augusta jobs