Library has poetry contest for kids

Jennie Feinberg is looking for budding poets.

"We had a poetry contest last year but it was during Black History Month and the theme was limited to black history and the black experience. We decided to do one this year during national poetry month," said Ms. Feinberg, the young-adult librarian for the East Central Georgia Regional Library system.

Though there is no specific theme, the poems must be 50 lines or less.

Before working at the Main Branch Library, Ms. Feinberg worked with young-adult programs at the Nancy Carson Library in North Augusta. Each year, the library had two contests for young adults - a ghost story contest in October and a poetry contest in April.

"In North Augusta, we always got more poetry than ghost stories," she said. "Kids might be more willing to try poetry."

Ms. Feinberg implemented the ghost story contest for the first time in Augusta in October. She received about 50 entries, but expects more interest in the poetry contest.

The deadline for entry is April 23. There are two categories - one for middle school pupils and one for high school students. Awards will be given to the top three winners in each category.

Winners will receive gift cards to Borders, courtesy of the Authors' Club of Augusta. First place will receive a $50 gift card, with a $25 gift card for second and a $15 gift card for third.

Winners will be announced at an event tentatively scheduled for May 3. The winners will have the opportunity to read their poems during the event.

There will be poetry writing workshops at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, at the Maxwell Branch Library, 1927 Lumpkin Road, and 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 16, at the Friedman Branch Library, 1447 Jackson Road. Registration is required.

Workshop attendance is not necessary to enter the contest. Poems should be typed and must include the poet's name, age, grade, school and phone number. Entries may be submitted at any library branch. For more information, call (706) 821-2600.


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