Originally created 11/05/06

Townhouse's decor reflects owner's creative inclinations



It all started with a painting.

When Karin Paulin moved into a Bertram Village townhouse three years ago, she bought a painting as the foundation of her home's decor.

The artwork became a personal inspiration.

"After I bought the painting, I said, 'I can (paint) that.'"

So she did. After she completed that, she decided to paint another picture, and then another.

Now, she paints quite often while listening to jazz, which she said creates a tranquil mood.

"The music is soothing. It's relaxing," she said.

Ms. Paulin's creativity doesn't stop there.

What most people would think of as useless or bland becomes her masterpiece, and another addition to her dcor.

"I try to take regular things and make them different," she said.

A bag clip? Add an artificial flower and it becomes a curtain holder.

Have a dull bathroom wall? Paint a small underwater mural on it.

How about a picture that just doesn't fit? Find a silk scarf and place it inside the frame over the picture. Ta-da! It's a new picture.

"If I knew then what I know now, I would have been an interior designer," said Ms. Paulin, a surgical technologist at University Hospital.

In addition to her own creations, she likes to buy items that fit into the dcor, sometimes debating whether she should. She said that she often ends up buying the item, with a simple justification.

"You only live once, right?" she said, laughing.

Ms. Paulin said she will be retiring soon, and she disagrees with those who tell her she will get bored when she does.

"I have too much to do to get bored," she said.

Reach Nikasha Dicks at (706) 823-3332 or nikasha.dicks@augustachronicle.com.

AT HOME WITH

The Family: Karin Paulin, and pets Lucky and Amber; she also has two children and three grandchildren.


The Home: A 1,400-square-foot townhouse in Bertram Village, with two bedrooms, two baths and a loft. The loft is a favorite of Ms. Paulin and her grandchildren.


It's a Fact: Ms. Paulin moved from Lubeck, Germany, to the U.S. in 1976. Until 1999, she went back to Germany to visit once a year. In her kitchen, she has a sign that says "Oma's Place." In German, "oma" means grandma.