Originally created 12/01/05

Across Georgia



Officers fatally shoot mayor-elect's husband

NEWTON - Two police officers face charges of involuntary manslaughter in a shootout that killed the husband of Newton's mayor-elect.

Herschell Bullard, the owner of Bullard Mobile Home Park, was killed in the Oct. 3 shooting. His wife, Markeita, went on to win the Nov. 8 election.

Newton police said that after a call to the park Mr. Bullard fired a weapon into the air, then at officers. Capt. David Zigan was shot and wounded. Officers shot and killed Mr. Bullard.

Capt. Zigan and Officer James Freeman are charged in the shooting.

Officer Freeman told city council members Tuesday that he plans to resign.

Officials talk to Ford about keeping plant

ATLANTA - Days after the announcement of the closing of a major automotive plant in the Atlanta area, Georgia officials have told Ford Motor Co. they plan to ask the General Assembly next year to keep the plant open, a move that could save 2,000 local jobs.

Details of the state's talks with the automotive company were outlined in a hearing Monday in Fulton County Superior Court, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

The plant currently makes the Taurus sedan in Hapeville, but Ford is considering retooling or expanding it, possibly for a new model, an attorney for the company said in court.

General Motors said last week it would close the Doraville site, affecting more than 3,000 workers.

Prisons chief warned about raising money

ATLANTA - Georgia's attorney general warned the state's prisons chief against fundraising practices similar to those that led to a GBI investigation earlier this year.

In an 11-page memo, Thurbert Baker scolded James Donald and said employees at the Department of Corrections should not raise money for any department functions - particularly from companies doing business with the state.

Mr. Donald turned to employee associations - composed mostly of corrections workers - to solicit donations from private industries, instead of using taxpayer dollars to stage a lavish conference that would bring together branches of the state's criminal justice system to explore ideas on how to better ease prison inmates back into society.