Originally created 11/27/05

News you can use



Now that you're thoroughly exhausted from the mad Thanksgiving sales rush, perhaps it's time to reflect on sharing with your children the true meaning of the Christmas season - that it's not just about receiving.

Maybe its time to start a new tradition. Take an afternoon and let your children choose a charitable group or two to give to for the holidays. Try to give them options that align with their interests, such as helping animals or other children.

If they're older, arrange for the family to spend an afternoon volunteering. You can find volunteer opportunities here by going to www.1-800-Volunteer.org or by contacting a group directly.

Here are a few local options for charitable giving for the Christmas season:

- Toys for Tots: This would be a great option for younger children because it involves buying a new toy and dropping it off at a collection site. The child could help pick out the toy. Drop-off sites will be available throughout the area. For information, call 736-2037.

- The Augusta Chronicle Empty Stocking Fund: P.O. Box 1928, Augusta, GA 30903-1928

- CSRA Humane Society: 425 Wood St., Augusta, GA 30904; phone 261-7387

- The Salvation Army: 2020 Gardner St., Augusta, GA 30904; phone 737-9424

- The American Red Cross, Augusta Chapter: 1322 Ellis St., Augusta, GA 30901; phone 724-8481

- Golden Harvest Food Bank: 3310 Commerce Drive, Augusta, GA 30909; phone 736-1199

Sources: The Philanthropic Initiative Inc., www.givingnh.org

Is your organization raising money for a charity this Christmas? E-mail your information to amy. swann@augustachronicle.com or fax it to (706) 722-7403, and we will include it in an upcoming News You Can Use. Please include a telephone number and name so that we can verify the information.

Today in regional history:

NOV. 27, 1948

Augustans little realize, when they relax in warm homes or sit down to loaded dinner tables, that neighbors crowded in small, dark, dilapidated homes are in actual want.

Bringing those needs to public attention in the Christmas season is the motive behind the annual appeal for funds and aid through the Cheerful Givers-Empty Stocking fund, co-sponsored by The Chronicle and radio station WRDW.

We wonder how many people know of this case. On one of the city's main thoroughfares, there is a row of crumbling houses backed up to the canal.

In one of these houses a young mother lives, who has a new baby, a son aged 3, and has just lost a little deformed girl.

She has no clothes or shoes. The infant is wrapped in spotlessly clean clothes that have long outlived their usefulness, and her little boy has only rags to wear. The husband does odd jobs, but contributes little to the family support.

As the children are small, the mother is unable to seek outside employment.

Her home, although showing signs of poverty, is as clean as soap and water will make it.

Christmas trappings will be absent in this home unless kind-hearted Augustans come forward to contribute either cash or the tangible evidence of aid.