Originally created 03/03/05

Odds and Ends



ORLANDO, Fla. - If drivers can't read Erik Rivera's sign, they might be going too fast.

Rivera used to street race on late nights through south Orange County. Now he goes at a slower pace, wearing a sign: "Don't Street Race. I Lost my Drivers License for 3 Years."

Orange Circuit Judge John H. Adams Sr. ordered the 24-year-old Kissimmee resident to wear the sandwich-board sign as a deterrent to other racers.

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PITTSBURGH (AP) - He could have survived two world wars and Prohibition. He also could have been dinner.

He's Bubba, a 22-pound leviathan of a lobster pulled from the waters off Nantucket, Mass., and shipped to a Pittsburgh fish market.

Based on how long it typically takes a lobster to reach eating size - about five to seven years per pound - Bubba may be 100 years old.

On Tuesday, owner Bob Wholey Wholey gave the lobster to the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, which will send him to an aquarium at a Ripley's Believe It or Not museum.

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CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - At first, Terri Smith thought it was just an oversized rock that attracted her dog's attention. Then the rock moved.

Smith found a giant tortoise, weighing some 60 to 70 pounds, trying to burrow into the dirt - an unlikely visitor to Wyoming.

State Game and Fish officials told Smith it was probably a desert tortoise, a species native to the Southwest.

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) - Fishermen often utter obscenities and throw their catch back in the water after hooking the long, skinny, ugly fish known as a garfish.

What they probably don't know is that, according to Alabama law, they are supposed to suddenly become the garfish's executioner.

The Alabama House passed a bill Tuesday to repeal a 1943 law requiring fishermen who catch a garfish - also called "junk fish" or "trash fish" - to kill it rather than throw it back in the water to be caught again.

Rep. Jeff McLaughlin said he's not sure why lawmakers initially wanted to kill the garfish. But he said the bill he sponsored is part of his effort to highlight some of Alabama's archaic laws and outdated language in the state constitution.

"I just want to point out the odd laws we don't need anymore," he said.

McLaughlin has also introduced a bill to remove language from the constitution that requires the Legislature to regulate dueling.

On the Net:

http://www.sea-ex.com/fishphotos/garfish.htm