Originally created 06/17/04

Pinmonkey plays a little bit of everythingHard to define



Pinmonkey might have been a great bluegrass band, had it not been for all those power chords. And the trio could have been a great honky-tonk country ensemble, were it not for Beatles-style hooks and folksy leanings.

But Pinmonkey, slated to play Saturday as part of the Hot Southern Night lineup, has never played by the rules.

The band, which recently pared down from a quartet to a trio, began as something of a whim, musicians playing together to hear what sort of sound could be derived from their own particular chemistry.

"Everything we do has always been very organic," said dobro player Chad Jeffers. "We've never worried about what format we might fit into. We love that we can follow a Roseanne Cash song with a Stones song. I think people respond to us because what we do isn't forced."

The band, which now consists of Mr. Jeffers, his brother Michael and lead singer Michael Reynolds, has recently endured the sort of upheaval that might have upended other bands. Six weeks ago, the band separated from its label and a few weeks later parted ways with drummer Rick Schell. Still, Mr. Jeffers said, there has never been a discussion of letting Pinmonkey draw to a close.

"It all boils down to the bond we have and the music," he said. "We just love making music together. I mean, we've all been with other groups, groups where the music was forced, and that's really tough. This is a real high. You just can't beat it."

Unlike famous brother acts such as the Kinks or the Everly Brothers, Mr. Jeffers said performing with his brother has actually brought them closer.

"We're lucky, because we do have this mutual admiration for each other and the things we do musically," he said. "Sure, there were times when we were growing up that we beat the hell out of each other, but the understanding that comes with being family can't be replaced."

Reach Steven Uhles at (706) 823-3626 or steven.uhles@augustachronicle.com.