Originally created 04/02/04

News you can use



BACK IN TIME

April 2, 1933

With every member of the Georgia delegation in Congress getting in line to get everything possible for his district, the march of the Roosevelt unemployment army began its first steps toward reality.

All Georgia representatives assured The Augusta Chronicle that they will protect the interests of the district, except Rep. Charles H. Brand, who has been ill at his Athens home for several months. For this reason, it is obviously impossible to get any definite line of action on what Augusta will get.

Congressman Carl Vinson and Homer C. Parker have comprehensive programs for the development of various enterprises within the next 30 days.

Search for more about local history from the pages of The Augusta Chronicle’s online archives. Subscribe to www.augustaarchives.com.

GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNING

Research from Israel’s ben-Gurion University of the Negev suggests that drivers listening to fast music run more red lights, change lanes more frequently, and have more collisions.

­Activities and entertainment events scheduled for this week include:

TODAY

PORTRAIT DEDICATION: A portrait of Bobby Jones will be dedicated at 11 a.m. at Forest Hills Golf Club, 1500 Comfort Road. The painting by Augusta artist William Rossignol was dedicated to Augusta State University by Foundation trustees and alumni John Bell and Dick Daniel.

SATURDAYVOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE: The Augusta-Richmond County Board of Elections will hold a voter registration drive from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Gilbert Manor Recreation Center. The drive is sponsored by Macedonia Baptist Church.

DRIVE, CHIP AND PUTT COMPETITION: The Mutual of Omaha Drive, Chip and Putt Junior Golf Skills Competition will be held at 1 p.m. at The First Tee of Augusta, 3165 Damascus Road. The competition is designed for boys and girls ages 7 to 14. Prizes will be awarded in each age group and for golfers who place first, second and third. The event is free. For more information, call 739-1904.

BOOK SIGNING: A breakfast and book signing will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History, 1116 Phillips St. Freddie Peterkin will speak about his book Imaginary Justice. A complimentary breakfast will be served. To reserve a place or for more information, call 724-3576.

SWAMP SATURDAY: The Phinizy Swamp Nature Park will hold Swamp Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at the park off Doug Barnard Parkway. Trained volunteers will guide a two-hour walk past wetlands and swamps and over scenic overlooks. For more information, call 828-2109.

PLANNING A MEETING

Before a business meeting:

  • Plan the meeting carefully: who, what, when, where, why, how and how many. Always invite those who can make or break the decision process and those who can undermine successful implementation.
  • Prepare and send out an agenda in advance. Put discussion items in a question format. For example, instead of listing "Budget Issues" as an agenda item, ask, "How can we streamline the budget process for next year?" This gets people thinking about strategies before you meet.
  • Determine whether any preliminary information could be sent out in advance along with the agenda. If yes, do so. Use e-mail to your advantage.
  • Come early and set up the meeting room. Round tables are best for open discussions and problem solving.
  • GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNING

    Research from Israel's ben-Gurion University of the Negev suggests that drivers listening to fast music run more red lights, change lanes more frequently, and have more collisions.

    DID YOU KNOW?

  • The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time television were Fred and Wilma Flintstone.
  • Coca-Cola was originally green.
  • Every day, more money is printed for Monopoly than for the U.S. Treasury.
  • Men can read smaller print than women; women can hear and smell better.
  • The state with the highest percentage of people who walk to work is Alaska.
  • Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.
  • San Francisco cable cars are the only mobile national monuments.
  • Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history: Spades - King David, Clubs - Alexander the Great, Hearts - Charlemagne and Diamonds - Julius Caesar.
  • In statues of people on horses, such as those often seen in parks, the position of the horse's legs carries a symbolic meaning. If the horse has both front legs in the air, the person riding it died in battle. If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle. If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
  • GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNING

    Research from Israel's ben-Gurion University of the Negev suggests that drivers listening to fast music run more red lights, change lanes more frequently, and have more collisions.