Originally created 04/02/04

Many feel cheated after daylight-saving time starts



Remembered happiness can never be recovered, even at Christmas.

- Russell Baker

Daylight-saving time starts Sunday. This is the bad time change - the one where you lose an hour of sleep.

  • received a press inquiry from a Madison Avenue public relations firm asking whether I wanted to interview one of their experts. They just completed a survey that found 91 percent of Americans feel "cheated, disoriented and tired" because of the lost hour.
  • Pretty surprising, huh?

    MORE EXPERTS: There are lots of sportswriters coming to town next week. I point this out because they often write silly things about our town and hurt some feelings.

  • think we should consider the source. Think of Orval Grove.
  • Orval, a major league pitcher during the talent-challenged 1940s, received five votes for induction into baseball's Hall of Fame during the 1958 voting.

    Nobody knows why the sportswriters were so excited about Orval. He won only 63 games over his major league career (and lost 73).

    The suspicion was that many confused him with Lefty Grove, a more talented and celebrated star of the 1930s. But that would ignore the fact that Lefty had already been a member of the Hall of Fame for several years.

    Well, everybody had a laugh at the sportswriters' expense, but I guess they got the last one. In 1960, Orval Grove got seven more votes.

    SPEAKING OF OUR TOWN: The death this week of British broadcaster Alistair Cooke has a connection. Mr. Cooke was the narrator in The Three Faces of Eve, the movie based on the book of the same title by Augusta psychiatrists Dr. Corbett H. Thigpen and Dr. Hervey M. Cleckley.

    Our longtime music columnist Don Rhodes points out that Mr. Cooke was among the VIPs present in Augusta for the world premiere of the movie at Miller Theater on Sept. 18, 1957. The movie was the real story told of an Edgefield woman who had multiple personalities.

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    TODAY'S JOKE: Here's one from Billy Cooper in North Augusta.

    It seems three friends from the local congregation were asked: "When you're in your casket and friends and congregation members are mourning over you, what would you like them to say?

    "Well," said Bill, "I'd like them to say I was a wonderful husband, a fine spiritual leader and a great family man."

    "Let me tell you," said Ed, "I would like them to say I was a wonderful teacher and servant of God who made a huge difference in people's lives."

    "That's fine," said Steve, "but I'd like them to hear them say: 'Look, he's moving!'"

    Reach Bill Kirby at (706) 823-3344

    or bill.kirby@augustachronicle.com.