Originally created 09/29/03

News you can use



BACK IN TIME

SEPT. 29, 1978

Augusta's mayor and the head of the city's Redevelopment Authority have called a news conference today at which they are expected to announce a development for the Southern Finance Building in the 700 block of Broad Street.

The announcement is expected to deal with a firm that has been negotiating to establish an office in the building to distribute electronic products.

The building is one of the largest in downtown Augusta but has had low occupancy in recent years.

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AROUND TOWN

MONDAY

MOTHER'S DAY OUT: Church of the Most Holy Trinity will hold a trial Mother's Day Out from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the church, 811 Telfair St. There will be crafts, stories, song and dance. The event is free. For more information, call 722-4944, ext. 315.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE SCREENING: Hope House Inc. for Women and Augusta Steppingstones to Recovery will hold a substance abuse education assessment screening workshop from 2 to 5 p.m. today and Tuesday at 1701 Wrightsboro Road. Professionals will assess people who might have an alcohol or drug problem. Pamphlets and information also will be given. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 733-1935.

THUMBS DOWN

Children who continue to suck a thumb, finger or pacifier past age 2 increase the risk of having protruding front teeth, according to a study of almost 400 children.

Children were more likely to have a cross bite the later they gave up thumb or pacifier sucking from birth to age 4. About 20 percent of those still hanging on to their habit at 4 had a cross bite, reports the study in the Journal of the American Dental Association.

The researchers next plan to study whether the condition persists in children's permanent teeth.

Before, experts advised that children could safely suck their thumbs or pacifiers until they entered school.

TOO MUCH TOOTHPASTE

The American Dental Association says too much toothpaste can be bad for children because it increases the chances of getting a permanent tooth discoloration that comes with too much fluoride. Children should use only a pea-sized amount of toothpaste.

TUNE UP YOUR WALKING

A study at Ohio State University found that listening to music while walking helped people with serious lung disease. Those listening to music covered an average of 19 miles in eight weeks; those who didn't averaged only 15.