Originally created 05/10/03

Castro gets a pass



Earlier this year Harry Belafonte, a formerly prominent entertainer who hasn't had a hit record in decades, generated some news for himself by smearing Secretary of State Colin Powell as a "house slave" for George W. Bush.

Well, Powell is his own man. But what is Belafonte but a servile lackey for Cuban overlord Fidel Castro?

By joining more than 160 other artists and intellectuals echoing the Cuban dictator's hate-America diatribes, Belafonte proves himself to be an apologist-propagandist for communist tyranny.

Many on the international left, who had been supportive of Castro in the past despite abundant evidence of Havana's contempt for freedom and civil rights, finally gagged on the dictator's recent summary executions of three men who tried to flee his tyranny, and on the sentencing of 75 dissidents to long prison terms.

Belafonte and his band of mindless leftists, including three Latin-American Nobel Laureates, penned a declaration of support for Castro in which the United States was implicitly blamed for the harsh crackdown.

Castro claimed, and his apologists signed onto it, that Cuba is under great pressure because the United States is engaging in a "destabilization" campaign in preparation for invading Cuba to topple the regime.

Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. Lately, all the movement in the United States has been toward making nice with the island nation - more trade and tourists. This is what Castro wants to end.

The more his slaves see how "the other half lives," the less compliant they'll be with his rule. Castro always clamps down when the scent of freedom is in the air. That's to be expected.

What's unexpected is that people like Belafonte and other so-called civil-rights activists, such as Lethal Weapon co-star Danny Glover, go to extremes to give Castro a pass. We doubt they'd love Cuba more than America if they lived there.