Originally created 03/03/03

PETA's intifada



Here's a good rule of thumb: Don't be surprised by anything from a group that thinks beer is a healthier drink than milk. Or that genuinely thinks the eating of chickens is comparable to the slaughter of 6 million Jews in the Holocaust.

Still, when it comes to People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, rules of thumb are seemingly made to be broken.

Thus, it shocks and amazes even the jaded to see that PETA has expressed opposition to Palestinian suicide bombings - but only because they sometimes hurt animals.

You read right. After more than 700 Israeli deaths from suicide bombings since 2000, it took the death of one donkey to raise the ire of PETA President Ingrid Newkirk. When explosives were strapped to the donkey for a suicide bombing in Jerusalem recently, Newkirk wrote a polite letter of complaint to Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

In it, Newkirk dutifully reminded Arafat of U.S. atrocities toward animals, while also lamenting the sight of stray cats dodging Israeli bulldozers in the Mideast violence.

"If you have the opportunity," Newkirk reportedly wrote to Arafat, "will you please add to your burdens my request that you appeal to all those who listen to you to leave the animals out of this conflict?"

She didn't, but ultimately might, include a bumper sticker saying, "I kill innocent civilians, but I brake for animals!"