Originally created 02/23/03

Pocket change



EMPLOYER SPOTLIGHT

BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP INC.

PRODUCT/SERVICE: Radio broadcasting

SALES: $115 million (2001)

HEADQUARTERS: Naples, Fla.

LOCAL OPERATIONS: Seven formats broadcast on nine stations in the Augusta-Aiken area.

LOCAL EMPLOYEES: 60 (approximate)

HISTORY: Founded in 1961 by George Beasley, the company has owned and operated stations in the Augusta market since the 1970s. Its purchase of GHB Broadcasting's WKXC and WSLT three years ago made it one of the market's top radio clusters in terms of revenue. Beasley, the nation's 17th largest radio company, went public in 2000.

RECENT NEWS: The company is scheduled to release its fourth quarter and year-end financial results Monday.

BIZ BITES

Marketing scam

The Georgia Public Service Commission is warning consumers of a telemarketing scam involving registration for the Georgia No Call List, a state-run program that restricts telemarketing calls to list subscribers.

Consumers have reported receiving calls soliciting as much as $300 in registration fees to get on the list. The solicitors also have asked for personal information such as Social Security numbers. The Governor's Office of Consumer Affairs is investigating the reports.

The Georgia No Call List, administered by the Public Service Commission, costs $5 for a two-year subscription and does not require consumers disclose Social Security numbers.

Georgia residents can register for the program via Internet at www.ganocall.com or by calling toll-free (877) 426-6225.

Low-tech filing

There's a plethora of tax preparation software and e-filing options out there, but for many people, the cheapest tools for filing federal returns are old-fashioned ones: a pencil, a calculator and a postage stamp.

That's because many of the online tax-preparation sites recommended by the IRS for the Free File program have restrictions on income and forms that could exclude many taxpayers.

Most of the 13 sites, a list of which can be found at www.irs.gov, are not free for taxpayers with adjusted gross incomes greater than $27,000.

Crisis management

Is the American CEO a firefighter in disguise?

Some apparently think so, according to a survey of 2,700 chief executives in nine countries who were asked, "What single management issue do you consistently spend most time on?"

Americans said they spend a fifth of their work time managing crises, compared to CEOs in France and Britain, who said crisis management takes only 9 percent of their time.

Beyond that, strategic planning ranked high in most countries, with that activity taking a quarter of CEOs' time. In Japan and South Africa, CEOs said planning depleted nearly a third of their schedules.

In Germany, internal communication topped the list of dominant activity, and in Hungary "monitoring" took the most time.

The survey was conducted by Proudfoot Consulting, a management consulting firm in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

Employee bonding

In these times of tight business budgets, employers are crimping raises, banishing bonuses and curtailing lavish business trips.

So what can a cash-strapped company do for workers? Increasingly, they're looking at shared employee trips.

From white water rafting to hiking and cycling to long strolls through the woods, employees are being treated to shared adventures with co-workers, according to The Herman Group, a North Carolina trend-forecasting agency.

The bicycle trip is among the more popular jaunts, because it can be tailored easily, from a half day to a week or more, according to the company.

BIZ TRIVIA

Malice in Dallas Southwest Airlines chairman Herb Kelleher and Kurt Herwald, chairman of Stevens Aviation, in 1992 decided to settle a dispute over who had the rights to the slogan "Just Plane Smart" by arm wrestling at Dallas' Sportatorium.

But who won the match?

Although Mr. Herwald, then 38, dispatched his then 61-year-old chain-smoking opponent in seconds, both companies announced after the match that they would each continue using the slogan.

"I don't care what you say about me," Mr. Kelleher said after the match. "Just remember my name."

ONLINE

Go to www.augustachronicle.com/stocks for quotes on nearly every publicly traded company; the quotes are updated each hour.

TAX TIPS

Go to www.augustachronicle.c om/taxtips for advice, IRS forms and e-filing information.

REACH US

Contact Business Editor Damon Cline at (706) 823-3486 or dcline@augustachronicle .com.