Originally created 11/27/02

News you can use



BACK IN TIME

NOV. 27, 1942

Augusta enjoyed a quiet, peaceful Thanksgiving Day yesterday.

There were no serious accident to mar the day, nor was there any disorder, police and county officials reported.

Up to a late hour last night, only two arrests had been made by city police, and they were for minor infractions. One slight auto accident was reported.

The day started sunny, but clouds came in, and a drizzle marred part of the afternoon for downtown window shoppers.

AROUND TOWN

Activities and entertainment events scheduled for this week include:

WEDNESDAY

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CEREMONY: A festival of lights ceremony will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Eighth Street Plaza, Riverwalk Augusta. The ceremony will feature the lighting of the city Christmas tree and downtown decorations. Mayor Bob Young will be present. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 821-1754.

THURSDAY

WINTER CONCERT: A winter concert will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel of Paine College, on Druid Park Avenue. The concert will feature the Paine College Concert Choir. The event is free. For more information, call 821-8323.

THANKSGIVING DINNER: The South Aiken Presbyterian Church will hold a Thanksgiving dinner from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at their location, 1711 Whiskey Road. The dinner is free and open to the public. For more information, call (803) 663-1872.

THANKSGIVING DINNER TO FEED/CLOTHE NEEDY: There will be a Thanksgiving dinner to feed the needy at 11 a.m. at Lucy C. Laney High School cafeteria, 1339 Laney-Walker Blvd. Clothes also will be given away. The dinner is free and is sponsored by the United Community Society Inc. For more information, call 737-7360.

COLD WEATHER TIPS

Tips from Atlanta Gas Light Co.:

  • Change disposable air filters in your furnace two or three times a year and have the furnace inspected by a professional at least once a year.
  • Check for appropriate insulation in the walls, attic and floor. Be sure to insulate pipes. Choose the right R-value, which is a measure of insulating power. Higher R-values mean greater insulating power, which provides greater household energy savings and cost savings. Look for R-values on insulation packaging or talk to a contractor.
  • Turn down the water heater's thermostat setting to about 120 degrees.
  • When washing clothes, use warm or cold water - not hot - and rinse with cold water.
  • Install a low-flow showerhead. Showers use less hot water than baths.
  • Programmable thermostats can be big energy savers for homes. Different temperature settings can be programmed for day and night or different days of the week. For most people, setting the temperature in the winter to 65 degrees from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., then back to 72 degrees for the morning, can save up to 15 percent on heating bills.
  • Lower your thermostat at night or whenever the house is unoccupied for more than a few hours. Close off unoccupied rooms and close heating vents.
  • Use sunlight to warm rooms. Close drapes and blinds at night to retain heat.
  • Wear more layers of clothing and warmer, insulated clothing while indoors.
  • Put extra blankets or a down comforter on the bed.
  • Learn more about your home's energy usage by completing an easy, free energy audit offered on Atlanta Gas Light Co.'s Web site at www.AtlantaGasLight.com.
  • Additional resources for consumer information related to energy usage:

  • National Association of Home Builders: www.nahbrc.org
  • U.S. Department of Energy: www.eren.doe.gov
  • Georgia Environmental Facility Authority: www.gefa.org
  • Residential Energy Services Network: www.natresnet.org
  • FAMILY DINNER

    Moms say getting the family to help clean up after the meal and preparing meals that please the whole family are their two biggest challenges at mealtime.

    Source: National Pork Board and Kraft Foods

    TAKE A LITTLE WALK

    In an analysis of 72,488 nurses over a 14-year period, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health found that those who walked six or more hours per week decreased their risk of suffering a stroke caused by a clot by 40 percent.