Originally created 09/07/02

Why blacks deserve reparations



There have been several letters regarding reparations to black Americans. As a young, college-educated black female, I am appalled at the number of white Americans against the idea. I do realize that if it weren't for the harsh treatment of and the aggressive nature in which my ancestors gained their "freedom," it would be a lot easier on me.

The most recent letter on Aug. 28 from Kathi Scott mentioned the Indians who would need reparations ("Reparations should go to Indians").

I am not opposed to that idea; however we black Americans were brought over here against our will. We were separated from our families and thrust into an unknown environment. We were forced to watch our mothers have sex with your forefathers.

We were not even considered Americans. We had to fight for our right to eat in a diner. We had to hide on trains in search of freedom and were hanged for looking at your grandmothers.

We used music to our advantage and were reprimanded for learning. Over time, an Indian of American descent can adapt to the American dialect, lighten their skin complexion and change their race on an application.

As a black American, I am not given that option. Some say we can go back. Back where? This is my home. Born and raised. I would like to be treated as such.

In closing, I would like to say that freedom for all is not here. When the Declaration of Independence was written, it excluded a huge group of people: black Americans. Although there have been huge steps taken to allow for a better, more unified America, it would take a lot more than a constitutional amendment to make us truly equal.

Nicole Ball, Hephzibah, Ga.