Originally created 08/12/02

Wisdom in water reclamation



Every couple of years water conservation makes the front page of The Chronicle. This time the drought extends its reach to the upper Savannah River, and Atlanta threatens to divert some huge amount for its use.

Not too long ago, flooding in Augusta and its surroundings was the issue - yet The Chronicle and others fail to talk about or propose ways to improve water usage efficiency.

Florida's coastal communities have a huge problem with saltwater intrusion. As fresh water is depleted, ocean water flows to fill the void, sometimes many miles inland.

Consequently, water reclamation plants were built to use water extracted from selected wastewater streams and divert it for irrigation of government property and such - everything but drinking water, just in case of a lapse in treatment.

This lowered the volume of water which simply drained away to the ocean - having been used once, perhaps to wash a car.

The island of Bermuda has no spring anywhere. All water on the island is either shipped in or is rain collected in rooftop catch basins. With all the pavement in the area and all the new housing creating runoff problems, it would be foolish to continue to allow rainwater to simply drain away.

I hope somebody can see the wisdom in reclamation now. It will be hideously expensive to install once it is too late.

John Culbert, Williston, S.C.