Originally created 07/17/02

Small portions



Weight Watchers on vacation

Taking a family vacation doesn't have to mean taking a vacation from sensible eating.

Weight Watchers International offers the following advice for eating on the go:

  • Be wary of the all-you-can-eat buffet. Review the entire buffet before digging in and splurge on the boundless display of fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Avoid drive-through fast food while traveling. Instead take along snacks such as biscotti, graham crackers, popcorn, pretzels and fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Don't skip meals. Going for long periods without food can lead to overeating.
  • Wine quenches thirst

    Wine can be a perfect partner to grilled foods.

    For a burger topped with lettuce, tomato, onion and ketchup, try an Australian Shiraz or California Syrah. If you prefer pickled relish and yellow mustard on your burger, go for a white zinfandel. And if your tastes are more toward toppings of sauteed mushrooms and Swiss cheese, try an Italian Chianti or California Sangiovese.

    For more wine-and-food-pairing ideas, visit wineanswers.com.

    Baseball's hot stuff

    If you think your team is hot, try a 5-ounce bottle of hot sauce sporting its logo and colors. Produced by Harry's Hot Sauce in Dallas, 30 Major League Baseball hot sauces are offered.

    The sauce can be ordered online at www.hotsauceharrys.com or by calling (800) 588-8979.

    Space-saving cooler

    Here's a compact way to keep food and beverages cold in the car and at the beach - Rubbermaid's Slim Cooler. The 13-quart container is 7 1/2 inches wide and can squeeze between or behind car seats. It comes with a padded shoulder strap to leave your hands free and has the capacity to hold 12 12-ounce cans.

    The suggested retail price is $12.99.

    For more details or to see an online catalog of other Rubbermaid products, visit www.rubbermaid.com.

    Contents of Cola

    What's in a cola? Once upon a time, it was the seeds of Cola acuminata, a 65-foot-tall West African tree in the same family as the cacao plant.

    Cola seeds, which can be more than an inch long and weigh up to half an ounce, are bitter because they contain tannin and caffeine. Conveniently, the bitter taste gradually disappears because of the action of ptyaline, the enzyme in saliva that breaks starches into sugars.

    In West Africa, cola seeds are chewed to ease hunger and give energy, which they do - they have a stimulant effect with few secondary effects. That's why cola seeds were used in cola drinks, because colas were originally marketed as pick-me-ups. Cola also has the property of making anything tasted after it taste sweeter.