Originally created 07/10/02

News you can use



BACK IN TIME

JULY 10, 1932

The slot machine war flared anew yesterday as city detectives confiscated machines in five establishments and impounded them at police headquarters.

Charged with operating a slot machine were Frank DeLoach, John Alberson, Gus Antonokas and T.R. Beckum.

The charges were booked against the men by Detective Sgt. M.O. Mathews and Detective Jack Hoover.

HOLD THE FRIES

Prevention Magazine reports that in a 12-year study of 42,500 men, those eating a diet heavy on red meats, fries, refined grains and sweets ran almost twice the risk of developing diabetes as those eating a diet heavy on vegetables, fruits and whole grains.

STAY DRY

It's hard not to perspire in the summer heat, but Mark Davis, a researcher for Procter & Gamble, says you'll sweat less if you avoid spicy foods, caffeine and nicotine, which trigger and ramp up your system's activity.

PASS THE NUTS

A new report from the Life Science Research Office published in the Journal of Nutrition found that walnuts help reduce the risk of heart disease.

COOKING CONTAINERS

It may be 90 degrees outside, but the soil temperature inside plant containers can reach 130 degrees. Control the temperature by elevating containers off the concrete using wood lathes or pot feet.

HISTORY PROGRAM

The Augusta Museum of History will present its next Brown Bag History Series at noon today. The speaker will be Jack Steinberg, a native of Augusta. He will be speaking on the history of the Walton Way Temple.

Mr. Steinberg is a graduate of the Academy of Richmond County and the University of Georgia. He is a member of Adas Yeshuron Synagogue and the Walton Way Temple (Congregation Children of Israel). Mr. Steinberg has written numerous books and articles, including The Jews of Augusta for the Augusta Genealogical Society and United for Worship and Charity, which is a history of the Walton Way Temple. He has served the community as president of the Augusta Jewish Federation, a member of the Waynesboro Rotary Club, a teacher in the Religious School of the Walton Way Temple and a member of the Augusta Genealogical Society.

The Brown Bag History Series is free to members and costs $2 for nonmembers. Reservations are required. Bring your lunch; the museum will provide a beverage and dessert. Please call the Education Department for reservations, 722-8454.

The Augusta Museum of History is located at 560 Reynolds St. downtown. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Free admission is offered on Sundays. Please call 722-8454 for more information or visit us at our Web site, www.augustamuseum.org.

OUTDOOR SAFETY

Unintentional injuries continue to be the fifth leading cause of death after heart disease, cancer, stroke and chronic lung disease. Yearly, about 60.5 million people seek medical attention or suffer at least one day of activity restriction from an injury.

MCG Health Systems issues the following safety tips, adaptable for the

year.

  • Wear properly fitted bicycle helmets. Helmets should cover the upper part of the forehead to cushion it in case of impacts.
  • Riding a motorcycle in 90-degree or hotter weather can be dangerous to your health. Your body sweats, so drink plenty of fluids and drape a wet towel around your neck.
  • Regardless of your skin type, a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 should be used if you are going to be in the sun for more than 20 minutes.
  • To help prevent heat-related illnesses, wear lightweight and light-colored clothing, carry water or juice, drink continuously and eat frequent, small meals.
  • After being outdoors for a long period, inspect yourself for ticks, and shower immediately after coming indoors.
  • When running, do not wear headsets, so you can hear an approaching car or attacker, stay clear of parked cars or bushes, vary your route, and have your door key ready when approaching home.
  • Studies show that wearing your seat belt adds to longevity and helps alleviate potential injuries in car crashes.
  • Learning to swim is the best thing you can do to stay safe in and around the water.