Originally created 09/02/01

Cooking the kill gets easy



OK. You shot it. Now what?

Cooking wild game and fish is sometimes as challenging as bringing home a deer - or catching a cooler of hybrids.

That's why Martinez taxidermist and deer processor Angel Hamilton thought it would be fun to compile a cookbook to offer successful hunters an opportunity to be equally as successful in the kitchen.

"I've gotten those calls from wives, saying 'my husband killed a deer and got a standard cut with all these roasts, so now what do I do with it?"' she said. "This should help people know what to do."

Her 36-page recipe collection is a lesson in simplicity - starting with its unassuming name: Angel's Taxidermy Wild Game Cookbook.

That's because cooking wild game is a simple science, she said. It involves very basic things - and common ingredients like garlic, Worcestershire sauce, Italian dressing, pepper and onions.

"Wine is a great ingredient too," she said. "I'm like Justin Wilson - I like my wine when I'm cooking."

There are strategies for kabobs, gumbo and jerky. And easy methods to make fish, doves and duck into tasty dishes, too.

"Most of the recipes are the ones our friends and people we hunt with have given me," she said. "Everything in here we've cooked and tried. There are some we cooked and tried and didn't like - and they're not in there."

Some recipes are veritable no-brainers, she acknowledged. But they are nonetheless necessary - especially to novices.

"I was tempted not to bother putting some of these in here, because they're so simple," she said. "But it's important to show people how simple you can cook, and how good wild game can be."

Hamilton plans to sell the book for $5 to cover her printing costs.